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Affordable Housing

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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 1, 2008
The city’s Housing and Human Services Committee wants sub-division developers to actually build the affordable housing units required by law. The City Council will review the recommendation at today's 6 p.m. meeting. Under the current requirement in the city’s Municipal Code, developers of sub-divisions of three or more units may pay an in-lieu fee rather than must build affordable housing units equal to 25% of the project. “I am discouraged about the whole prospect of affordable housing in Laguna Beach,” Planning Commissioner Anne Johnson.
NEWS
July 19, 2002
Barbara Diamond City officials gave a green light Tuesday to a project that will provide low-cost housing in a prime Downtown location for 55 years and loaned the developer $200,000 to help build it. The City Council voted 3-0 to approve a 27-unit, affordable-housing project at 450 Glenneyre St. The project will fulfill the state requirement for low-income housing. Housing and Human Affairs Committee Chair Kent Russell gave the project a solid recommendation.
NEWS
May 17, 2002
Barbara Diamond The Orange County Board of Supervisors on May 7 approved $667,001 loan commitment to Related Companies of California for construction of a 30-unit affordable housing project at 450 Glenneyre St. Supervisor Tom Wilson said the commitment proved that "impossible" projects can succeed with city, county and private sector cooperation. Additional funding will be needed. "The whole ball of wax is getting an allocation from the state of low-income housing tax credits," said William Witte, a partner in Related Cos. "It is a twice-yearly competitive process and we should know if we are successful by August."
NEWS
January 24, 2003
Barbara Diamond The affordable housing project on Glenneyre Street may get too expensive to be built. An environmental study indicates the presence of hazardous materials on the site, previously undetected. The study commissioned by the developer, Related Cos., revealed tetrachloroethylene, a cleaning solvent used primarily in dry cleaning. Cleanup could cost as much as $1.3 million if all the soil must be removed to a hazardous waste disposal site.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 4, 2008
City officials kept open the option to decide whether a developer must pay a fee for not building a house that is affordable by city standards at its Tuesday meeting. They also want the fees raised substantially. The City Council voted 4-0 not to support a proposal by the Housing and Human Services Committee to eliminate the fees that developers of residential subdivisions of three or more lots or units may pay in lieu of building affordable housing on or off the project site. Staff opposed the proposal because the Planning Commission is in the middle of reviewing the Housing Element of the General Plan, which includes the affordable housing in-lieu fee, acknowledged to be woefully inadequate.
NEWS
August 22, 2003
We're a good example. Other cities, ahem Newport Beach, can take a look at how Laguna Beach has handled affordable housing and hop to it. Sure, we're required to have a certain amount of affordable housing, and not everyone is thrilled about it, but most realize it's the right thing to do and most importantly, it's getting done. The 26 units for very low income residents being built on Glenneyre Street will fulfill the state requirement for affordable housing in Laguna Beach.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
Anne Frank I am concerned about the action taken by the City Council at its Sept. 2 meeting, giving preferred status to senior citizens for the affordable housing project on Glenneyre Street. Unfortunately there was no television coverage of this meeting on either Tuesday or Saturday, and thus I am very grateful to the Coastline Pilot and reporter Barbara Diamond for bringing this issue to the attention of the public. The purpose of the Glenneyre project is to provide affordable housing for low-income working people in Laguna who cannot afford the high rentals in town.
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NEWS
By Billy Fried | April 10, 2014
Many people assume I have designs on political office since I often use my column to advance my opinions. Now why would I want to go and ruin a perfectly good gig? Truth is, who would want these thankless jobs, where half the population loves you, the other half loathes you, and everything you try to do to better the city gets undermined by a loud and uncivil minority, who call you names and make accusations about your honesty? Take for instance the artist live-work project on Laguna Canyon Road, which has been put through the ringer by opponents in the surrounding neighborhood.
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NEWS
By David Hansen | November 17, 2011
Over the last 100 years, technological advances have revolutionized entire countries, but over the last 1,000 years, social advances have done little to fundamentally change homelessness and hunger. In Laguna Beach, the homeless issue is a known quantity. Every night, the 45-bed shelter in Laguna Canyon is filled to capacity. There is always a waiting list. Those who don't make it sleep elsewhere — usually outside. Occasionally, especially on cold, rainy nights, they manage a bed in a local church with the help of volunteers.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | October 30, 2009
Owners of multi-family properties who don?t want to include affordable units in the development of new housing units will pay less under a proposed method of calculating in lieu fees, but the fees will be higher for replacement of affordable or rental housing. The council approved at the Oct. 20 meeting the concept of the financing gap method of calculating fees paid in lieu of including affordable housing in new residential projects of three or more units on existing building sites or when two or more lots or units are subdivided.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | October 2, 2008
A proposed change to the method of calculating fees in lieu of building affordable housing will cost developers more money than they have paid in the past. The City Council approved at the Sept. 2 meeting an increase in the in-lieu fees from $47,000 to $150,000 per affordable unit. The council also directed staff to hire a consultant to refine the method of calculating the fees, as requested by the Planning Commission. “Staff recommended a change in the method of calculating the per-unit, in-lieu fees, based solely on the cost of developed lots in the city, rather than including undeveloped lots, which makes a big difference in the fees,” Planning Commissioner Norm Grossman said.
NEWS
July 11, 2008
The folks at the Transportation Corridor Agencies do not seem to understand that the people of Southern California do not want nor need a toll road that would compromise San Onofre State Beach and Trestles surf break. So we are back to battle, one more time, to show them and the federal government just what ?no? means. The TCA has appealed to the feds at the Department of Commerce to over turn last February?s ruling by the California Coastal Commission. Now it?s clearly up to us to tell them loudly and convincingly that we want the CCC?
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 4, 2008
City officials kept open the option to decide whether a developer must pay a fee for not building a house that is affordable by city standards at its Tuesday meeting. They also want the fees raised substantially. The City Council voted 4-0 not to support a proposal by the Housing and Human Services Committee to eliminate the fees that developers of residential subdivisions of three or more lots or units may pay in lieu of building affordable housing on or off the project site. Staff opposed the proposal because the Planning Commission is in the middle of reviewing the Housing Element of the General Plan, which includes the affordable housing in-lieu fee, acknowledged to be woefully inadequate.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 1, 2008
The city’s Housing and Human Services Committee wants sub-division developers to actually build the affordable housing units required by law. The City Council will review the recommendation at today's 6 p.m. meeting. Under the current requirement in the city’s Municipal Code, developers of sub-divisions of three or more units may pay an in-lieu fee rather than must build affordable housing units equal to 25% of the project. “I am discouraged about the whole prospect of affordable housing in Laguna Beach,” Planning Commissioner Anne Johnson.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
The Laguna Beach City Council will consider final recommendations from the Planning Commission regarding a proposal for preferential parking in the Flatlands/Woods Cove neighborhoods of midtown Laguna at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 in the Council chambers at City Hall, 505 Forest Ave. Preferential parking restricts street parking for the public, with residents able to obtain permits exempting them from the restrictions. Residents in the midtown area have complained that customers and employees of nearby businesses are taking parking spots away from residents.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | June 8, 2007
Affordable artist live/work space was the primary topic of discussion at an annual joint City Council/Arts Commission meeting on Tuesday. Commissioner Pat Kollenda said that additional steps need to be taken to help the city's artists to remain in town. "It's not just commissioning them — it's allowing them to live here," Kollenda said. The group discussed ways in which other cities like New York make such spaces possible. Councilmember Cheryl Kinsman voiced her support, but said that she still had concerns.
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