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Arundo

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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 2, 2012
At the Jan. 24 City Council meeting Mayor Pro Tem Verna Rollinger publicly supported funding sources for the removal of arundo in Aliso Creek. Arundo is a reedlike plant that can grow to more than 20 feet. The removal was a goal of the proposed SUPER — Stabilization, Utility, Protection and Ecosystem Restoration — project for the creek . The county had permits to remove the arundo but lacked funding, Rollinger said. However, Proposition 50 allocated $3.9 million to the SUPER project that must be used within the next two years or it will revert to the state.
NEWS
By Beau Nicolette | February 3, 2014
The rolling hills of Laguna Canyon were Hallie Jones' backyard. She grew up off Castle Rock Road and rode horses through the sage-covered trails. She remembers the fight in the early '90s to preserve the open space and sported a Save the Canyon sticker on her lunch box. Now the Laguna Beach native is the executive director of the Laguna Canyon Foundation. The nonprofit works to maintain parts of the 20,000-acre South Coast Wilderness. It was set up in 1990 after voters approved a $20 million bond to purchase Laguna Canyon to prevent development there and keep it open space.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 24, 2009
City officials want to root out non-native plants on private property that have escaped and invaded the city’s open space. The City Council gave preliminary approval Sept. 15 to the addition of five plants to the list of noxious weeds that property owners must eradicate or the city will do it and bill them for the work. “We have no money or staff to do this, so we will do the same as Oceanside and rely on the public to identify the plants and then we’ll put them on the weed abatement list,” said City Manager Ken Frank.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | August 8, 2013
Laguna Coast Wilderness Park is Laguna's frontyard. That's what people see when they head into town on Laguna Canyon Road. Locals can take pride in the preservation of the 7,000 acres of wilderness they helped preserve, one of the gems of the South Coast Wilderness area, which includes Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, Crystal Cove State Park and the City of Irvine Open Space Preserve, totaling about 20,000 acres, "My heart beats an...
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond, barbara.diamond@latimes.com | August 26, 2010
Exotic might not be the word most people would use to describe artichoke thistle, but that's what plants that threaten native vegetation are called and the city wants to get rid of it. The Fire Department Weed Abatement Coordinator is preparing to work with private property owners to eradicate the thistle, pampas grass, fountain grass and arundo on their land. The four plants are listed among the most invasive wild land vegetation by the California Exotic Pest Plant Council. "Exotics are plants that multiple on their own indiscriminately, without care and naturalize where they are not native," said landscape architect Bob Borthwick Borthwick has donated time to the city to identify the key areas that need to be cleared in Laguna and Bluebird canyons.
NEWS
October 16, 2009
The following is from the Laguna Beach City Council meeting of Oct. 6. Tax levies lowered for some City Treasurer Laura Parisi announced a substantial reduction or elimination of assessment district levies for 711 Laguna Beach property owners. The reductions or eliminations will be reflected on 2009-10 tax bills. WHAT IT MEANS Bonds for Assessment Districts 84-1R and 93-1 were paid off a year early, Parisi said. Levies were reduced by 50 % for district 95-1, due to construction credits and interest earnings.
NEWS
February 7, 2003
THE NATURAL VIEWPOINT Clones are in the news again, especially artificial cloning of human beings. I stress the word "artificial" because nature has been cloning plants and animals for a very long time without test tubes. I'll start with plants. Plants that reproduce vegetatively, without making flowers and seeds, produce identical copies of themselves. Violets, strawberries, mint, and bamboo, among others, send runners (horizontal stems) out from the main plant.
NEWS
By Bryce Alderton | August 16, 2013
It's clear to most that the brush surrounding Laguna Beach is brittle, and the Laguna Beach Fire Department is doing all it can to ameliorate firestorm risk. "You can't deny we're coming out of a drought year," Laguna Fire Chief Jeff LaTendresse said. "Fire season for us this year is early. It's already taking its toll on structures in Ventura [during the Springs Fire in May]. " Subsequent fires have charred Southern California's landscape, including the Silver fire near Banning, which burned more than 20,000 acres earlier this month, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection website.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | April 11, 2008
And you thought the only alien invaders you had to worry about were little green men from Mars. Nope. They are green alright, but they are in your own backyard and they have roots instead of legs. Unchecked, these invaders could take over Laguna, according to landscape architect Bob Borthwick . Borthwick shared his concern about the battle against invasive, non-native plants Monday night at the Laguna Canyon Conservancy Dinner at which he was the guest speaker.
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NEWS
By Beau Nicolette | February 3, 2014
The rolling hills of Laguna Canyon were Hallie Jones' backyard. She grew up off Castle Rock Road and rode horses through the sage-covered trails. She remembers the fight in the early '90s to preserve the open space and sported a Save the Canyon sticker on her lunch box. Now the Laguna Beach native is the executive director of the Laguna Canyon Foundation. The nonprofit works to maintain parts of the 20,000-acre South Coast Wilderness. It was set up in 1990 after voters approved a $20 million bond to purchase Laguna Canyon to prevent development there and keep it open space.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 2, 2012
At the Jan. 24 City Council meeting Mayor Pro Tem Verna Rollinger publicly supported funding sources for the removal of arundo in Aliso Creek. Arundo is a reedlike plant that can grow to more than 20 feet. The removal was a goal of the proposed SUPER — Stabilization, Utility, Protection and Ecosystem Restoration — project for the creek . The county had permits to remove the arundo but lacked funding, Rollinger said. However, Proposition 50 allocated $3.9 million to the SUPER project that must be used within the next two years or it will revert to the state.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 24, 2009
City officials want to root out non-native plants on private property that have escaped and invaded the city’s open space. The City Council gave preliminary approval Sept. 15 to the addition of five plants to the list of noxious weeds that property owners must eradicate or the city will do it and bill them for the work. “We have no money or staff to do this, so we will do the same as Oceanside and rely on the public to identify the plants and then we’ll put them on the weed abatement list,” said City Manager Ken Frank.
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