Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Coastline Pilot HomeCollectionsBacteria
IN THE NEWS

Bacteria

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Josh Aden | January 18, 2008
The runoff at Aliso Creek in South Laguna Beach could be cleaner in the future. The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board amended it’s Basin Plan in December to put caps on bacteria levels in watersheds from San Diego to Laguna Beach. The amendment is meant to meet the region’s water quality goals as well as comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Clean Water Act leaves it to local governments to control water quality. The board’s new plan establishes Total Daily Maximum Loads (TDML)
NEWS
May 1, 2009
Laguna Beach High School students resumed testing local ocean waters for bacteria this week after a three-month hiatus. The seven-year program, which had been sponsored by the Laguna Beach chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, was halted in December after Surfrider decided not to fund water testing in the schools. The Laguna Beach School District PTA Council stepped in with funding to continue the program through the end of the year. The bacteria counts are not considered official by the county Health Department, which conducts its own routine testing and posts warning signs or closes beaches when bacteria counts are at unsafe levels.
NEWS
By By Dan Beighley | January 6, 2006
High school's Surfrider Club keeps track of bacteria at local beaches.Cruising Laguna's coastline once a week, members of the high school's Surfrider Club put the community's ocean water to the test. The club is a grass-roots effort funded through donations from the Laguna Beach Surfrider Club to help increase community awareness about the level of bacteria in the water. The good news, according to club president Marshall Thomas, is that rarely does his group find problems.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | July 31, 2008
Laguna Beach’s ocean water is nearly perfect, with six of Orange County’s top 10 cleanest locations falling within the city, according to a national nonprofit’s annual report released Tuesday. Environmental Protection Agency officials test 10 locations in Laguna Beach twice a week throughout the year for bacteria levels, and of those, six sites never exceeded national bacteria level standards. Four other sites, from Bluebird Canyon to Victoria Beach, exceeded EPA standards less than 5% of the time.
NEWS
By Ashley Breeding, coastlinepilot@latimes.com | December 2, 2010
Parents of football players at Laguna Beach High School are divided about whether the program is safe. At a time when the threat of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a potentially fatal bacterium, on high school football fields and in locker rooms has been in the news, some parents are worried about allegations of a lack of precautions being taken to protect student players. Others defend the athletic department and say the district is taking all of the proper safety measures.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
Warnings were posted this week at three Laguna beaches where bacterial levels exceeded healthful standards as determined by the Orange County Environmental Health Division. None of the three beaches were closed, but signs were posted warning swimmers that the level of fecal bacteria in the water could cause disease, said Monica Mazur of the environmental health division. Warnings at two South Laguna beaches, Thousand Steps and Three Arch Bay, covered 300 feet each on Tuesday, and swimmers 150 feet north and south of Hotel Laguna were also warned.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 10, 2007
City officials want Laguna Beach taken off the hook for a bacterial reduction plan proposed in a state water-quality control plan for this region. The city has asked the Regional Water Quality Control Board San Diego Region, which has jurisdiction over part of Laguna Beach, to remove about seven miles of shoreline from the federal 303(d) list of impaired waters, claiming federal standards for bacteria reduction were met in 2006. Removal from the list would exempt the city from having to submit an implementation plan to reduce bacteria counts in impaired water.
NEWS
July 23, 2007
Laguna’s Aliso Beach reopened Monday around noon after a Friday sewage spill from Aliso Creek closed the beach all weekend, forcing the World Championship of Skimboarding, “The Vic,” to move to West Street Beach. The spill, 1,000 gallons of raw sewage, originated from a strip mall located at El Toro Road and Rockfield in Lake Forest, said Monica Mazur of the Orange County Health Department. Health officials closed the beach within 300 feet north and south of Aliso Creek.
LOCAL
June 13, 2008
The South Orange County Surfrider Chapter invites volunteers to test their favorite beach for bacteria this summer. Test results will be posted in local businesses throughout Laguna Beach, on Surfrider’s website and in local newspapers. Testing takes about 30 minutes once a week and will be conducted at 31973 S. Coast Hwy. The program will begin with training at 4 p.m. June 22. Testing will take place every Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m. from June 24 to Aug. 26. Those interested should contact Marshall Thomas at (949)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ashley Breeding, coastlinepilot@latimes.com | December 2, 2010
Parents of football players at Laguna Beach High School are divided about whether the program is safe. At a time when the threat of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a potentially fatal bacterium, on high school football fields and in locker rooms has been in the news, some parents are worried about allegations of a lack of precautions being taken to protect student players. Others defend the athletic department and say the district is taking all of the proper safety measures.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 1, 2009
Laguna Beach High School students resumed testing local ocean waters for bacteria this week after a three-month hiatus. The seven-year program, which had been sponsored by the Laguna Beach chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, was halted in December after Surfrider decided not to fund water testing in the schools. The Laguna Beach School District PTA Council stepped in with funding to continue the program through the end of the year. The bacteria counts are not considered official by the county Health Department, which conducts its own routine testing and posts warning signs or closes beaches when bacteria counts are at unsafe levels.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | August 1, 2008
Laguna Beach’s ocean water is nearly perfect, with six of Orange County’s top 10 cleanest locations falling within the city, according to a national nonprofit’s annual report released Tuesday. Environmental Protection Agency officials test 10 locations in Laguna Beach twice a week throughout the year for bacteria levels, and of those, six sites never exceeded national bacteria level standards. Four other sites, from Bluebird Canyon to Victoria Beach, exceeded EPA standards less than 5% of the time.
NEWS
By Josh Aden | January 18, 2008
The runoff at Aliso Creek in South Laguna Beach could be cleaner in the future. The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board amended it’s Basin Plan in December to put caps on bacteria levels in watersheds from San Diego to Laguna Beach. The amendment is meant to meet the region’s water quality goals as well as comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Clean Water Act leaves it to local governments to control water quality. The board’s new plan establishes Total Daily Maximum Loads (TDML)
NEWS
By By Dan Beighley | January 6, 2006
High school's Surfrider Club keeps track of bacteria at local beaches.Cruising Laguna's coastline once a week, members of the high school's Surfrider Club put the community's ocean water to the test. The club is a grass-roots effort funded through donations from the Laguna Beach Surfrider Club to help increase community awareness about the level of bacteria in the water. The good news, according to club president Marshall Thomas, is that rarely does his group find problems.
Coastline Pilot Articles Coastline Pilot Articles
|