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NEWS
By Chris Williams | March 24, 2011
Surf trips to Baja were a rite of passage for many a surfer growing up in Southern California. The promise of clean, uncrowded waves being all the incentive any young surfer needed to make the trip south of the border — a brief, yet glorious respite from the crowded line-ups of our local breaks. With Spanish being spoken and roads signs being few, the three-hour trip to San Miguel (from inside Mexico) was one always filled with plenty of excitement along with a measure of anxiety for the typical gringo.
NEWS
By Catharine Cooper | August 12, 2010
Summer vacation! The word bounces around inside my mouth with all the joy inherent in time spent away from 'normal' daily endeavors. The magic of vacation, or "holiday" to use the delightful British term, is to step away, to put down the mantle, and enjoy the natural rhythms of one's own body. This August, to both escape the interminable grey and to find warm waters to surf, a drive was planned down Mex 1 with good friends Cathy Cox and Patrick Humphrey. The trip would include a birthday celebration for Patrick, who hails from Montana.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
STEVE KAWARATANI "Whale time" 1.28.05 $50 "Two roads diverged and we ... took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference." -- with apologies to Robert Frost "Poor Mexico -- so near to God but so close to the United States." -- with apologies to Porfirio Diaz A pleasant breeze wafted through the restaurant patio. Our motel was just a few hundred yards removed from a salt evaporation pond in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur. Even in winter, the Baja sun is strong enough to keep us comfortably warm.
LOCAL
By Catharine Cooper | October 17, 2008
It seemed incomprehensible that Santa Ana winds whipped through the canyons and once again turned parched hillsides into conflagrations. I was sitting in the path of a Hurricane Norbert, and rain fell from the sky in buckets. Norbert had his origins off the southern coast of Mexico as a loosely formed tropical depression, and slowly grew as it ambled toward the coast of Baja at a leisurely 7 to 10 knots. To the great surprise of those who predict the course and strength of these storms, Norbert went from a Category 1 to a 4 on the Safir-Simpson scale.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
THE GARDEN FANATIC "Only the desert has a fascination ... to ride alone -- away from man." -- D. H. LAWRENCE "Oh, down in Mexico!" -- JAMES TAYLOR I'm just crazy about the Milky Way -- not the candy bar (although I admit a weakness for that chocolate delicacy, as well) -- but that band of stars best viewed away from city lights. For that reason, Catharine and I never hesitate to escape the nighttime glare of Newport and Irvine whenever and wherever the opportunity arises.
NEWS
June 27, 2003
WEATHER TIDBITS Fourteen hours and 26 minutes. That's how long the sun took to travel across our sky on Sunday, and that bright light up there actually made a cameo appearance late in the afternoon to the delight of many. When the Catalina Eddy gets to a certain thickness, clearing actually takes place right at the coast instead of inland. A total reversal from the usual pattern. Monday, it was even better -- total clearing as of 3 p.m., first time that's happened since Memorial Day. Desert communities only made it to 85 degrees Sunday so it cleared here on the coast.
NEWS
February 14, 2003
WEATHER TIDBITS Puerto Escondido Junior visited El Moro's Elevator Cove on the morning of Tuesday, Feb. 11. The last time this happened was Feb. 3, 1998. The time before that was March 1, 1983. All three events are products of Senor El Nino. Here are the ingredients that have to gel to make it happen only once a decade on the average: A severe angle (165 degrees) south-southeast wind swell, groundswell combo at 6 to 8 foot plus at seven- to 10-second intervals, a 1.0 or lower tide and brisk easterly winds -- plus an abnormally full sandbar.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
WEATHER TIDBITS The first tropical storm of the season is tracking at a rapid pace to the west, situated about 1,000 miles southwest of the tip of Baja, not affecting our weather or surf. Aleeda formed on May 21, about 1,100 miles south southeast of the tip of Baja and hurried due west (270 degrees). When they form that far down there, they usually do trek to the west, especially this early in the season. This storm marks the fourth consecutive year that a spinner was born in May, way early in the season.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
DENNIS McTIGHE Every six years, when the storm named Linda shows up, she delivers. Hurricane Linda was born last Thursday off Southern Mexico and began tracking northwest while slowly gaining strength. By Monday the 15th she entered the Southern California surf window moving northwest at 10 knots with sustained winds of 90 mph gusting to near 100 mph. Today, Tuesday, she sits 300 miles west/southwest of the tip of Baja -- she did all the right things to set the table for a healthy, severe angle (165 degrees)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Chris Williams | March 24, 2011
Surf trips to Baja were a rite of passage for many a surfer growing up in Southern California. The promise of clean, uncrowded waves being all the incentive any young surfer needed to make the trip south of the border — a brief, yet glorious respite from the crowded line-ups of our local breaks. With Spanish being spoken and roads signs being few, the three-hour trip to San Miguel (from inside Mexico) was one always filled with plenty of excitement along with a measure of anxiety for the typical gringo.
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NEWS
By Catharine Cooper | August 26, 2010
Magic has never happened for me inside a cubicle or when face-planted in front of my computer (although I am an admitted digital junkie). For those of you who know me and/or have followed this column, then you understand that I am most alive when I am in an outdoor setting. Whether it's wandering the valleys and glaciers of Torres del Paine National Park in southern Chile, sailing a tall ship through the waters of the San Juan Islands, or tossing beach-gathered "dream" feathers from the top of Mt. Whitney, it is adventure that fattens and fills my soul.
SPORTS
By Patricia Wells-Wright | April 2, 2010
Editor?s Note: Patricia Wells-Wright, the mother of Benjamin and Will, served as part of their pit crew for this race. Brothers Benjamin and Will Wright, Laguna Beach natives, brought home another trophy for Baja racing recently. The Mastercraft Tecate SCORE San Felipe Baja 250 was held March 13 in Mexico?s picturesque fishing village of San Felipe, 120 miles south of the U.S. border on the east side of the Baja California peninsula. Benjamin Wright graduated from Laguna Beach High in 2002; Will Wright graduated two years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | August 7, 2009
Normally, if you want to eat on the beach in Laguna, you have to pack a lunch and schlep it to the seaside. This is certainly the cheapest way to go but if you don?t like sand in your sandwiches or sharing salads with the seagulls, then the Terrace at the Hotel Laguna may be the place for you. It is one of the very few spots, surprisingly, where you can actually dine at the shore and are welcome in your shorts. There?s nothing fancy here. The tables and chairs are the ubiquitous outdoor white plastic and the floor is concrete, so you can come in dripping from your dipping.
LOCAL
By Catharine Cooper | October 17, 2008
It seemed incomprehensible that Santa Ana winds whipped through the canyons and once again turned parched hillsides into conflagrations. I was sitting in the path of a Hurricane Norbert, and rain fell from the sky in buckets. Norbert had his origins off the southern coast of Mexico as a loosely formed tropical depression, and slowly grew as it ambled toward the coast of Baja at a leisurely 7 to 10 knots. To the great surprise of those who predict the course and strength of these storms, Norbert went from a Category 1 to a 4 on the Safir-Simpson scale.
NEWS
By CATHARINE COOPER | November 2, 2006
NEWS
By STEVE KAWARATANI | August 11, 2006
"Oh, down in Mexico!" "I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, damn, I am less nurturing than a desert." Catharine and I are frequent travelers of the Baja Peninsula, usually beginning at the Pacific in Tijuana, and completing in Loreto, on the shimmering Sea of Cortez. The majority of our time is spent driving in desert-like conditions. In fact, two-thirds of Baja California may be classified as desert. Annual rainfall varies from four inches in the higher climes of the central desert region, to less than two inches in the San Felipe Desert sub-region, located on the Gulf side.
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