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Clean Water Act

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NEWS
May 3, 2002
Catharine Cooper Who are we, the human beings, to this planet? Are we a part of it? Or do we stand separate from? If we choose "separate," then we can hold the untenable position of unaccountability for our actions, and the effects of mindless profit models can be championed. If we choose "part of," then we must hold ourselves responsible for issues like acid rain, toxic waste spills, open-pit mining and potential arctic drilling. This is the week of the 32nd celebration of Earth Day. In 1970, 20-million people across the United States gathered in activities and demonstrations on behalf of the environment.
NEWS
By Josh Aden | January 18, 2008
The runoff at Aliso Creek in South Laguna Beach could be cleaner in the future. The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board amended it’s Basin Plan in December to put caps on bacteria levels in watersheds from San Diego to Laguna Beach. The amendment is meant to meet the region’s water quality goals as well as comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Clean Water Act leaves it to local governments to control water quality. The board’s new plan establishes Total Daily Maximum Loads (TDML)
NEWS
By Jack Eidt | December 4, 2009
In South Orange County?s native coastal sage and oak woodland environment, the rivers and streams serve as the fount of life for a thriving biodiversity hot spot. These same valleys and gently rolling hills have also proven superb human habitat. After 45 years of growth and development, the streams have often been reduced to toxic drainage ditches that foul our world-class beaches and waves and have turned Aliso Beach and Doheny State Beach into notorious dangers to human and aquatic health, affecting tourism, fisheries and quality of life for our outdoor-loving sun-seekers.
LOCAL
By Roger E. Butow | June 30, 2008
Failed Environmental Planning: South County Watersheds “Success has a thousand fathers; failure is an orphan.” Origin Unknown Never was a quote so true as this one in regards to the degrading watersheds and alarming water quality impairments in South Orange County. County or municipal taxpayers aren’t being asked to shoulder the major burden of ecological restoration, even though it was our Board of Supervisors and other locally elected officials who got us into this mess.
NEWS
October 1, 2004
Barbara Diamond The city gave two thumbs up for the addition of a radiation facility to the Cancer Center on the South Coast Medical Center campus. "A center must have a diagnostic unit, surgical, chemotherapy, counseling and support systems, social services and radiation," said Dr. Gabor Kovacs, center medical director. "With this addition we will have completed the Cancer Center." The Planning Commission voted 4-0, with Rob Zur Schmide absent from the Sept.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2007
McKenney discusses care for Aliso Creek The Laguna Beach Business Club will host Larry McKenney discussing "Protecting the Environment In and Around Aliso Creek" at its monthly meeting, planned at 7:30 a.m. Thursday, April 19 at the Hotel Laguna. McKenney is the Director of the Watershed and Coastal Resources Division of the County of Orange. He is responsible for the county's implementation of water quality programs, including compliance with the Clean Water Act and the management and protection of Orange County's beaches and streams.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
When I ran for City Council a couple of years ago and knocked on doors to meet Laguna residents, the most common complaint I heard from parents was a concern about ocean water pollution. I heard pretty disturbing stories from some very angry parents about how kids had gotten sick while surfing or skim boarding and, as a result, were forbidden to play in the beach in their own back yard. As a result of this input, I educated myself on the subject. What many don't understand is that, in large part, we are creating this problem ourselves.
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | March 17, 2006
Laguna Creek has a new look where it runs by the Dog Park on Laguna Canyon Road. Dozens of volunteers provided the manpower for a major landscaping project last month organized by city officials with the expertise of two local landscape architects. Turf grass was removed along the parkway, sycamore trees and California live oaks were planted, and invasive plants such as pampas grass were hauled out. Instead of rushing to the ocean, the creek now meanders and even pools beside a willow that covers it on both sides.
LOCAL
By Roger von B├╝tow | June 5, 2009
Drought cycles and resulting fresh water resource depletions renew the century-old battle in California to find a sustainable balance of protected wilderness and increased human population demands in our home state. Many of these skirmishes wind up in courtrooms, the issues confused in the layperson’s mind by the labyrinth of regulatory edicts and hearing room proceedings. Portrayed in the media as pitting “Humans vs. Nature,” zero-sum games, many residents are unaware of the nexus between preservation and restoration of eco-systems for threatened or endangered species and improved safe environs for us all. A recent decision by NOAA’s National Marines Fisheries Service due to years of lobbying by the Clean Water Now!
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NEWS
By Jack Eidt | December 4, 2009
In South Orange County?s native coastal sage and oak woodland environment, the rivers and streams serve as the fount of life for a thriving biodiversity hot spot. These same valleys and gently rolling hills have also proven superb human habitat. After 45 years of growth and development, the streams have often been reduced to toxic drainage ditches that foul our world-class beaches and waves and have turned Aliso Beach and Doheny State Beach into notorious dangers to human and aquatic health, affecting tourism, fisheries and quality of life for our outdoor-loving sun-seekers.
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LOCAL
By Roger E. Butow | June 30, 2008
Failed Environmental Planning: South County Watersheds “Success has a thousand fathers; failure is an orphan.” Origin Unknown Never was a quote so true as this one in regards to the degrading watersheds and alarming water quality impairments in South Orange County. County or municipal taxpayers aren’t being asked to shoulder the major burden of ecological restoration, even though it was our Board of Supervisors and other locally elected officials who got us into this mess.
NEWS
By Josh Aden | January 18, 2008
The runoff at Aliso Creek in South Laguna Beach could be cleaner in the future. The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board amended it’s Basin Plan in December to put caps on bacteria levels in watersheds from San Diego to Laguna Beach. The amendment is meant to meet the region’s water quality goals as well as comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Clean Water Act leaves it to local governments to control water quality. The board’s new plan establishes Total Daily Maximum Loads (TDML)
NEWS
May 3, 2002
Catharine Cooper Who are we, the human beings, to this planet? Are we a part of it? Or do we stand separate from? If we choose "separate," then we can hold the untenable position of unaccountability for our actions, and the effects of mindless profit models can be championed. If we choose "part of," then we must hold ourselves responsible for issues like acid rain, toxic waste spills, open-pit mining and potential arctic drilling. This is the week of the 32nd celebration of Earth Day. In 1970, 20-million people across the United States gathered in activities and demonstrations on behalf of the environment.
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