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LOCAL
By Catharine Cooper | January 9, 2009
“The trouble with our times is that the future is not what it used to be.”   When I was a little girl, my great-grandmother used to collect string. She’d stand at the sink in her kitchen and carefully untie the packages from the butcher or the produce man and lay the strands across the pale yellow tile counter. Bits that wrapped the newspaper were added to the mix. Each strand was tied to the other, and the end attached to the growing white ball that lived in her scissor drawer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | November 2, 2007
The Laguna Art Museum pays homage to beach culture, consumerism and pastries with its latest offerings, which run through Jan. 27. The main exhibition focuses on Wayne Thiebaud. Titled “70 Years of Painting,” the exhibit surveys the American painter’s development. The earliest painting is from 1936. In addition to his famous works depicting common objects like cakes, the show includes a number of more unfamiliar genres in Thiebaud’s oeuvre, including impasto seaside settings, quick studies and drawings, and several figural portraits.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013
Summer treats at the Laguna Art Museum include three new exhibitions: "Faux Real," "Sea Change: Tanya Aguiñiga's Bluebelt Forest" and "ex•pose: beatriz da costa. " The season begins with an opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. June 1 at 307 Cliff Drive, Laguna Beach. Curated by Grace Kook-Anderson, the museum's curator of contemporary art, "Faux Real" features artists Michael Arcega, Sandow Birk, Libby Black, Julie Bozzi, Amy Caterina and others from June 2 till Sept. 29. Infusing daily household items with a twist, this display is a commentary on culture and consumerism.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
What is your plastic footprint? That question was posed by Charles Moore, a noted environmentalist who spoke recently at Orange Coast College about the tons of plastic trash floating and harming life in the Pacific Ocean. Moore, an avid boater, has been crusading against the ?Great Pacific Garbage Patch.? It?s scary stuff. Plastic in the water is harming marine life that mistakenly feeds on debris, or uses it as shelter, disrupting the food chain. Dead albatrosses, fish and mammals are being found with plastic caps, bags, wrappers and other byproducts of consumerism inside their carcasses.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
Mary A. Castillo To the steady count of assistant choreographer Liza Bugarin, the dancers of the Laguna Beach High School Dance Co. twist, turn and kick through one of the acts from the upcoming production, "VOLUME." Meanwhile stage techs are busy focusing lights, testing sound and setting up the video monitors that will be part of the show. In the center of it all stands Tod Kubo, producer/director of "VOLUME" and the founder of the Laguna Beach High School Dance Co. In his classroom there are no dry-erase boards or desks.
NEWS
By SHERWOOD KIRALY | April 27, 2007
I did some traveling this month and was reminded that the entire world has been carved into territories by two major soft-drink companies. In James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart's old pictures like "The Roaring Twenties," bootleggers would swagger into a Prohibition-era speakeasy and browbeat the owner into taking their booze instead of the booze sold by a rival gangster. If the owner refused, he was threatened or beaten until he switched brands. A week or so later the rival bootleggers would come in and the owner was again threatened, etc. It was tough to be a barman back then.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2008
Ring in the holidays with ?green? wreaths Worn-out bicycle tires, dental floss holders, plastic water bottles, political pins and old guitar strings are just a few of the materials used in holiday wreaths made from recycled content on display at Laguna Green. The exhibit will be on view from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday as part of the Recycled Wreath Contest sponsored by Waste Management. Jessica Destefano, organizer of the exhibit, was inspired by how much fun it is to make something out of recycled items instead of buying new. ?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | June 16, 2006
The summer season at Laguna Art Museum will be a study in contrasts. Two major exhibits ? "Artists at Continent's End: The Monterey Peninsula Art Colony, 1875-1907" and "Pervasion: The Art of Gary Baseman and Tim Biskup" ? debut on June 18 at the museum. "Artists at Continent's End" will focus on California's earliest artists and examines three styles typical to the colony: French Barbizon, Tonalism and Impressionism. The traveling exhibition, which originates from the Crocker Museum in Sacramento, will feature artists such as Jules Tavernier, Arthur Mathews and William Keith, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | November 2, 2007
?Shag? What is Shag?? The elderly woman at the Laguna Art Museum reception desk looked perplexed as Mike Stice, the museum?s director of operations, attempted to explain artist Josh Agle?s first solo museum show to her. Upstairs from the museum?s new Wayne Thiebaud show, Agle?s lithe ladies of leisure form a nude Space Age rainbow along one wall. Spike-breasted and seductive, they beckon viewers into Agle?s world of martinis, Eames chairs and cat-eye glasses. Agle is better known as Shag, a combination of the last two letters of his first name and the first two letters of his last name.
NEWS
January 23, 2004
Anti-hospitality night letter went too far Having read Gene Cooper's letter about Hospitality Night, ("Hospitality Night missing hospitality" Coastline Pilot, Jan. 9) it is unfortunate that Cooper experienced an evening that was not to his liking. It is also unfortunate that he believes "the vast majority [of merchants] use the night just to extend daytime working hours." I find it hard to believe that the "vast majority" is an accurate statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LOCAL
By Catharine Cooper | January 9, 2009
“The trouble with our times is that the future is not what it used to be.”   When I was a little girl, my great-grandmother used to collect string. She’d stand at the sink in her kitchen and carefully untie the packages from the butcher or the produce man and lay the strands across the pale yellow tile counter. Bits that wrapped the newspaper were added to the mix. Each strand was tied to the other, and the end attached to the growing white ball that lived in her scissor drawer.
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