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LOCAL
By Victor Opincar | May 20, 2008
Many locals know the West Ridge Trail well for walking, jogging and biking. For the uninitiated, this is the dirt road between Alta Laguna Park and Aliso Viejo that runs parallel to Laguna Canyon Road with many access points into the Aliso-Wood Canyon Wilderness park.   The trail was becoming hazardous due to erosion from past rains and daily driving by the Laguna Beach County Water District to a water tank.  What the locals and other users don't know is that the Water District stepped up and repaired trail damage around their pipelines and took the initiate to get the County involved.
NEWS
By JAMES PRIBRAM | May 18, 2007
The more I travel, the more I look back on my trips with clarity. Clarity in the sense that when I get home the more the trip just seemed like a dream and maybe in some regard it is dream. A dream that begins with the fact that I am able to visit such cultures like Chile, were they use oxen to move their small fishing boats in and out of the ocean. It's a dream to experience a culture that is not only so pristine but one that remains simple in the ways of life — a man and woman holding hands and picking grapes off a tree with a smile.
NEWS
June 26, 2009
?Outraged? is as good a word as any to describe how the Laguna Beach art community feels upon learning of the sale of 18 California Impressionist works originally donated to the Laguna Art Museum many years ago and lost in a failed merger attempt with what is now the Orange County Museum of Art. The paintings sold by OCMA to an unnamed Laguna Beach collector include works by William Wendt and others who were instrumental in the founding of...
NEWS
August 2, 2002
Suzie Harrison Most people would think of leisure and relaxation if they thought of taking a trip to breathtaking Fiji. The 300 islands, pristine white beaches, blue lagoons, reefs decorated with colorful fish, as well as rich forests and mountains across 200,000 square miles of ocean conjure a vision of a vacation dream come true. But for a group of Laguna locals and Southern Californians the gorgeous view was just a backdrop to their task.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
Elisabeth M. Brown A good naturalist is prepared for surprises; indeed, one of the great joys of spending time in nature is that you never know what you're going to find. We were high in the French Alps in late June, during a spell of warm weather. On a quiet dirt road, an explosion of butterflies engulfed each passerby in a fluttering cloud. They jostled each other, seeking prime spots on the mud drying around puddles left from recent thunderstorms.
NEWS
February 7, 2003
Mary A. Castillo Laguna Beach resident Ed Perry, 87, has a passion for preserving the past. Every Sunday, he greets visitors who come to the Murphy Smith House on Ocean Avenue for a glimpse of Laguna's history. His love of history began when he took a British history and literature class at Whittier College in the 1930s. Even though he made a career of running his father's furniture business, Perry parlayed that interest into the establishment of the Whittier Historical Society.
NEWS
By ELISABETH M.BROWN | December 30, 2005
You know the feeling: The house starts to shudder, maybe it jumps a bit. Dishes rattle, pictures on the walI tilt. If you're outside in a quiet place, you may hear a rumbling. We live in earthquake country, and somewhere, near or far, titanic rock masses have shifted relative to each other across a fault line. We ride on the thin rocky crust of the Earth, on a giant tectonic plate moved by the great heat engine of the Earth. The Pacific plate, on which Southern California rides, is moving north at about one inch per year relative to the North American plate, where the rest of the U.S. is. It's only a matter of time before Laguna is a suburb of San Francisco.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
Our near record dry year brings to mind other times when Mother Nature was overly generous with her offerings. Over time, we have learned that things tend to balance out. Too much precipitation still creates problems, but in the old days it was worse. There was a paucity of paved streets in old Laguna, which made driving on some of the hillside roads after a heavy rain an exciting endeavor. Part of my duties with Dad's paper was to deliver that free offering every Friday starting at about 2 a.m. Traffic was never a problem, even at midday, but the slick muddy roads were.
NEWS
By Catharine Cooper | July 16, 2010
Oh my god, it really is the sun! When I woke to blue skies after 2½ months of grey, the color seemed iridescent, like something out of a dream. I shunned my indoor yoga class and headed straight to the beach and park for an early morning walk covered in sunscreen. It's been a long introduction to summer. The trough that has hung on the edge of the West Coast has made most of my friends (and me) cranky and somewhat on edge. We are all sunlight junkies and were way low on our fix. Thankfully, the middle of July has shown her true colors, and the beach now beckons with summer fun. As I'd pondered the persistent dark and gloomy weather over the past weeks, and fomented in my cranky state, I'd begun to question why I stay in Laguna in the summer.
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LOCAL
By Victor Opincar | May 20, 2008
Many locals know the West Ridge Trail well for walking, jogging and biking. For the uninitiated, this is the dirt road between Alta Laguna Park and Aliso Viejo that runs parallel to Laguna Canyon Road with many access points into the Aliso-Wood Canyon Wilderness park.   The trail was becoming hazardous due to erosion from past rains and daily driving by the Laguna Beach County Water District to a water tank.  What the locals and other users don't know is that the Water District stepped up and repaired trail damage around their pipelines and took the initiate to get the County involved.
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