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Environmental Restoration

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NEWS
By Charlotte Masarik | February 13, 2009
The SUPER Project (STABILIZATION + Utility Protection + Environmental Restoration) for Aliso Creek is nothing more than a gussied-up flood-control channel to stabilize the bank and is a federally funded, $45-million boondoggle that will serve only the Athens Group and its Aliso Creek Golf Course and Resort. It will in no way change the fact that the water will remain dirty, the outflow into the ocean will remain dirty and the natural habitat will be gone forever by the channelization.
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | April 16, 2009
A 7-mile stretch of Aliso Creek is under study by the Army Corps of Engineers and the County of Orange for ways to improve wildlife habitat and water quality. The study is separate from the SUPER (Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration) Project, a $45 million federal effort to tame the Aliso watercourse, which is subject to flooding and erosion. The study is a spinoff of an overall Orange County Watershed study of 2002 — which preceded the SUPER Project — and will evaluate the creek from Pacific Park in Aliso Viejo to the ocean, including 1,000 feet of the Wood Canyon tributary to Aliso Creek, said John Vivante, lead planner with the Corps for the watershed project.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 22, 2006
Two proposals to clear the ponding of polluted waters on Aliso Beach were endorsed Tuesday by the City Council. The council voted unanimously to reverse its opposition to a county proposal to regularly excavate — or "break" — the berm that dams the toxic runoff from the Aliso Creek, supported by neighboring homeowners. The council also approved the proposal by some South Laguna residents who oppose the dredging to conduct a 100-day pilot test of the efficacy of diverting a portion of the daily flow to the coastal treatment plant.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 16, 2006
A $4.6 million state grant to clean up Aliso Creek is no drop in the bucket. The grant is a substantial portion of the local matching funds needed to meet federal funding requirements for the proposed $45 million SUPER project, the acronym for Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration of the creek. The project is one of seven submitted by the county for Proposition 50 funding, as part of the Integrated Regional Water Management Plan. "We are starting to get something going, and a lot of the credit goes to the hard work of Elizabeth [Councilwoman Pearson-Schneider]
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | April 27, 2007
Someone other than Councilwoman Elizabeth Schneider, who sits on state Regional Water Quality Control Board-San Diego Region, will have to represent the City Council's opposition to some provisions in the proposed new regional permit. Schneider, appointed to the board by Gov. Schwarzenegger, is banned from voting at the board hearings on the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit because she is an elected official for an area that is impacted. "I can't vote there, so I feel I can vote here [at council]
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | January 16, 2009
The Aliso Creek SUPER Project surfaced as a top county priority with the election Tuesday of Fifth District Supervisor Pat Bates as chairwoman of the board. ?SUPER? stands for stabilization, utility protection and environmental restoration. Federal funding is sought and Bates is going after it. Bates was unavailable for comment, but her office confirmed Thursday that she has made the project a priority and is looking for ways to make it happen. ?The supervisor has directed the Leg [Legislative]
NEWS
April 29, 2005
Lauren Vane Bill Roley wants Laguna Canyon to get back to nature. The Laguna Beach resident has come up with an idea that he says will both address environmental concerns on the flood-prone canyon road and bring the community together.Roley is presenting a watershed management project to the City Council, in hopes that community members will decide to get to work and reduce ocean pollution and flooding in the canyon corridor. "Instead of digging up the past, I'm helping to invent the future," said Roley, who previously worked as a watershed coordinator at California Dept.
NEWS
March 19, 2004
Suzie Harrison The El Morro Community Assn. has appealed the decision by a Superior Court judge to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the environment report prepared by the State Parks Department. Residents of El Morro Village filed the suit claiming state park officials had prepared the report improperly. It was denied on Aug. 15. The residents' leases expire in December 2004. The state appellate court will decide whether to hear the case. The State Parks Department is moving ahead with its plan.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 10, 2009
The stabilization of Aliso Creek is not set in concrete. Construction of 26 low, concrete structures in Aliso Creek is only one option under consideration as a way to rehabilitate the creek and prevent further erosion, a county official assured the council Tuesday in an update on the status of the Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration project. “We had a lot of negative comments about the structures,” said Mary Anne Skorpanich, director of the Orange County Watershed Program.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 10, 2007
City officials want Laguna Beach taken off the hook for a bacterial reduction plan proposed in a state water-quality control plan for this region. The city has asked the Regional Water Quality Control Board San Diego Region, which has jurisdiction over part of Laguna Beach, to remove about seven miles of shoreline from the federal 303(d) list of impaired waters, claiming federal standards for bacteria reduction were met in 2006. Removal from the list would exempt the city from having to submit an implementation plan to reduce bacteria counts in impaired water.
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NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | April 16, 2009
A 7-mile stretch of Aliso Creek is under study by the Army Corps of Engineers and the County of Orange for ways to improve wildlife habitat and water quality. The study is separate from the SUPER (Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration) Project, a $45 million federal effort to tame the Aliso watercourse, which is subject to flooding and erosion. The study is a spinoff of an overall Orange County Watershed study of 2002 — which preceded the SUPER Project — and will evaluate the creek from Pacific Park in Aliso Viejo to the ocean, including 1,000 feet of the Wood Canyon tributary to Aliso Creek, said John Vivante, lead planner with the Corps for the watershed project.
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NEWS
By Charlotte Masarik | February 13, 2009
The SUPER Project (STABILIZATION + Utility Protection + Environmental Restoration) for Aliso Creek is nothing more than a gussied-up flood-control channel to stabilize the bank and is a federally funded, $45-million boondoggle that will serve only the Athens Group and its Aliso Creek Golf Course and Resort. It will in no way change the fact that the water will remain dirty, the outflow into the ocean will remain dirty and the natural habitat will be gone forever by the channelization.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 16, 2006
A $4.6 million state grant to clean up Aliso Creek is no drop in the bucket. The grant is a substantial portion of the local matching funds needed to meet federal funding requirements for the proposed $45 million SUPER project, the acronym for Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration of the creek. The project is one of seven submitted by the county for Proposition 50 funding, as part of the Integrated Regional Water Management Plan. "We are starting to get something going, and a lot of the credit goes to the hard work of Elizabeth [Councilwoman Pearson-Schneider]
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 22, 2006
Two proposals to clear the ponding of polluted waters on Aliso Beach were endorsed Tuesday by the City Council. The council voted unanimously to reverse its opposition to a county proposal to regularly excavate — or "break" — the berm that dams the toxic runoff from the Aliso Creek, supported by neighboring homeowners. The council also approved the proposal by some South Laguna residents who oppose the dredging to conduct a 100-day pilot test of the efficacy of diverting a portion of the daily flow to the coastal treatment plant.
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