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NEWS
May 8, 2008
Costs to repair Bluebird Canyon after the June 1, 2005 landslide have ballooned to $35 million, and city officials aren’t sure how much of that will be paid for by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The city will submit a request to FEMA for $33 million for the Bluebird Canyon and Flamingo Road restoration, Laguna Beach City Manager Ken Frank told the City Council Tuesday. “It is 99.99% done,” Frank said of the repairs needed to restore the area after the landslide.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
The city manager says post-landslide work to stabilize canyon will cost at least $1 million more than first estimated.The cost of emergency repairs to stabilize Bluebird Canyon before the winter rainy season is rising, and those in charge of the project still don't know when it will be completed or what the final cost will be. Robert Burnham, community recovery coordinator, told the City Council on Dec. 6 that he has been wrong every time he...
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 29, 2011
The city has challenged a 100-year floodplain map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that adversely affects Canyon Acres property owners. FEMA's map is based on aerial photographs of areas that generate enough run-off to create a problem in a flood. City officials claim the map relied on outdated information and have submitted a hydrology study to make their case. "The map was done on an extremely broad-brushed level," said City Engineer Steve May, director of the Public Works Department.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
After weeks of digging out of the mud that cascaded through town and inundated Laguna Canyon, and much volunteer effort on behalf of victims, there is a sign that Laguna Beach will have extra help on the way. President Obama's declaration of a statewide emergency from the late December rainstorms should result in assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Whether that will translate into assistance for individuals is another question. FEMA refused to provide financial help for victims of the 2005 Bluebird Canyon landslide, but did come through with backing for the replacement of roads, sewers and other infrastructure to make the canyon safer.
NEWS
March 2, 2007
Bluebird Canyon landslide fix costs keep escalating and so does the time frame for completion of the massive job of rebuilding a neighborhood that nature destroyed. Community Recovery Coordinator Bob Burnham is pushing back the projected completion date for repairs by five months — from the end of March to the end of August. If — and that may be a big if — "buildable" lots are restored to the area by then, it will mean the Flamingo Road area will have been uninhabitable for more than two years following the June 1, 2005 disaster.
NEWS
November 18, 2005
City officials are understandably relieved that the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, has reversed its earlier decision that the June 1 landslide in Bluebird Canyon was not due to the record rainstorms of last winter. That means the city is eligible for possibly as much as $5 million in disaster funds to pay for the city's response to the disaster and for repairs to the infrastructure. But the city's still not out of the woods when it comes to fully recovering from the landslide.
NEWS
By: | October 14, 2005
It's heartening that a politician of the rank of Sen. Dianne Feinstein -- who hails from Northern California, after all -- has taken a personal interest in the fate of Bluebird Canyon. Feinstein, who visited this week, was shocked by the state of the landslide zone so long after the event. Much has been done to remove destroyed homes, but much remains to make the area safe for the remaining residents farther up-canyon, not to mention giving displaced homeowners the ability to rebuild.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 10, 2006
Some of the city's most ardent Republicans toasted Dianne Feinstein Friday night, acknowledging what Democrats thought all along: the senator has clout. City officials learned earlier in the day that Feinstein's efforts on behalf of the city's quest for Federal Emergency Management Agency funding for landslide repairs were successful. FEMA announced it would authorize substantial funding for the city, thought to be $10.4 million. "I never thought I would be toasting Dianne Feinstein, but she absolutely deserves our gratitude for making people at FEMA understand the needs of our community," Design Review Task Force Chair Matt Lawson said.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | September 29, 2011
The city has challenged a 100-year floodplain map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that adversely affects Canyon Acres property owners. FEMA's map is based on aerial photographs of areas that generate enough run-off to create a problem in a flood. City officials claim the map relied on outdated information and have submitted a hydrology study to make their case. "The map was done on an extremely broad-brushed level," said City Engineer Steve May, director of the Public Works Department.
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NEWS
January 27, 2011
After weeks of digging out of the mud that cascaded through town and inundated Laguna Canyon, and much volunteer effort on behalf of victims, there is a sign that Laguna Beach will have extra help on the way. President Obama's declaration of a statewide emergency from the late December rainstorms should result in assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Whether that will translate into assistance for individuals is another question. FEMA refused to provide financial help for victims of the 2005 Bluebird Canyon landslide, but did come through with backing for the replacement of roads, sewers and other infrastructure to make the canyon safer.
NEWS
May 8, 2008
Costs to repair Bluebird Canyon after the June 1, 2005 landslide have ballooned to $35 million, and city officials aren’t sure how much of that will be paid for by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The city will submit a request to FEMA for $33 million for the Bluebird Canyon and Flamingo Road restoration, Laguna Beach City Manager Ken Frank told the City Council Tuesday. “It is 99.99% done,” Frank said of the repairs needed to restore the area after the landslide.
NEWS
March 2, 2007
Bluebird Canyon landslide fix costs keep escalating and so does the time frame for completion of the massive job of rebuilding a neighborhood that nature destroyed. Community Recovery Coordinator Bob Burnham is pushing back the projected completion date for repairs by five months — from the end of March to the end of August. If — and that may be a big if — "buildable" lots are restored to the area by then, it will mean the Flamingo Road area will have been uninhabitable for more than two years following the June 1, 2005 disaster.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 10, 2006
Some of the city's most ardent Republicans toasted Dianne Feinstein Friday night, acknowledging what Democrats thought all along: the senator has clout. City officials learned earlier in the day that Feinstein's efforts on behalf of the city's quest for Federal Emergency Management Agency funding for landslide repairs were successful. FEMA announced it would authorize substantial funding for the city, thought to be $10.4 million. "I never thought I would be toasting Dianne Feinstein, but she absolutely deserves our gratitude for making people at FEMA understand the needs of our community," Design Review Task Force Chair Matt Lawson said.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
The city manager says post-landslide work to stabilize canyon will cost at least $1 million more than first estimated.The cost of emergency repairs to stabilize Bluebird Canyon before the winter rainy season is rising, and those in charge of the project still don't know when it will be completed or what the final cost will be. Robert Burnham, community recovery coordinator, told the City Council on Dec. 6 that he has been wrong every time he...
NEWS
November 18, 2005
City officials are understandably relieved that the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, has reversed its earlier decision that the June 1 landslide in Bluebird Canyon was not due to the record rainstorms of last winter. That means the city is eligible for possibly as much as $5 million in disaster funds to pay for the city's response to the disaster and for repairs to the infrastructure. But the city's still not out of the woods when it comes to fully recovering from the landslide.
NEWS
By By Barbara Diamond | November 18, 2005
Federal agency reverses decision, offers funds to help pay for costs of June landslide; sales tax hike still needed, city says.It pays to know the right people. California Sen. Dianne Feinstein announced Monday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency would provide financial assistance to Laguna Beach to help repair damage wrought by a landslide in June. The decision reversed an earlier FEMA ruling that the disaster was not eligible for funding. "This is terrific news," Feinstein said.
NEWS
By: | October 14, 2005
It's heartening that a politician of the rank of Sen. Dianne Feinstein -- who hails from Northern California, after all -- has taken a personal interest in the fate of Bluebird Canyon. Feinstein, who visited this week, was shocked by the state of the landslide zone so long after the event. Much has been done to remove destroyed homes, but much remains to make the area safe for the remaining residents farther up-canyon, not to mention giving displaced homeowners the ability to rebuild.
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