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FEATURES
December 25, 2009
Alternative Market a big success Neighborhood Congregational Church?s Alternative Christmas Market, sponsored over two weekends by JOY Ministry (Justice, Outreach and You), featured 14 organizations, Creations by Clara Lee and the Laguna Beach Resource Center Adopt-A-Family Program, in addition to NCC Kids. The grand total for purchases was $6,079, according to the church. The NCC Kids, under the direction of Mary LaRusso, sold $85 worth of reindeer and snowman ?poop?
NEWS
By STEVE KAWARATANI | January 27, 2006
"Plants which branch out widely are often more flourishing for a little timely pruning." -- with apologies to Thomas Babington Macaulay The question arises every winter: Why prune? Left to their own devices, many plants will grow wildly, unchecked and unproductive. The object of pruning, which in Plant Man parlance translates to cutting or trimming, is to modify plant growth. But before we set off to prune our roses or fruit trees, let's review how plants grow. All plants grow or elongate themselves by producing new growth at sites we call buds.
NEWS
January 17, 2003
THE GARDEN FANATIC "This bud's for you." -- anonymous "Plants, which branch out widely are often more flourishing for a little timely pruning." -- with apologies to Thomas Babington Macaulay The question arises every January, "Why prune?" Left to their own devices, many plants will grow wildly, unchecked and unproductive. The object of pruning -- cutting or trimming -- is to modify plant growth. But before we set off to prune our roses or fruit trees, let's review how plants grow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | July 17, 2009
A combination of recession economics, a rising awareness of the healthy benefits of organic produce and a growing appreciation for the taste of the freshest fruits and vegetables locally grown has spurred a mass movement of home vegetable gardening, similar to the victory gardens of World War II. Last year, a record number of Americans experimented with growing vegetables to offset rising food prices. The Burpee seed company did a study that confirmed that there is a cost-saving ratio of 1:25 for growing your own vegetables rather than buying them at the supermarket.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
STEVE KAWARATANI "A hair on the head is worth two on the brush." -- Irish Proverb "And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair." -- Kahlil Gibran I have always felt a bit unconventional, perhaps it's the reason why I grew my hair in the first place. Of course, that was 35 years ago, and it was fashionable on campus. It had always been symbolic; part statement, part security blanket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | January 29, 2010
Gardeners face myriad challenges, as rain and cold are a distinct possibility during an El Niño season. Good judgment on tree selection and pruning shows during and after major winter storms. In certain Laguna climes, there is the possibility of frost damage to orna- mentals and fruit trees. Unantici- pated wet and cold weather conditions may damage strawberries, early tomatoes and basil. Cold temperatures damage or destroy certain plant tissues by causing the water inside the plant to crystallize and damage the cell walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | May 8, 2009
Loose layers of organic or inorganic materials that are placed on the soil surface are mulches. The cultural practice of mulching serves many purposes — a 2-inch-thick layer insulates the soil from rapid changes in temperature and conserves water for plantings in the process. It reduces competition from weeds, prevents unsightly mud from splashing onto foliage and flowers, protects falling fruit from injury and gives the garden a “finished” look. Almost anything that can be composted may be used for mulching.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
City employees are expected to begin moving into the new municipal corporation yard at the ACT V parking lot site at 1900 Laguna Canyon Road Jan. 2 and are expected to be completely moved over by mid-January, according to City Manager Ken Frank in his Dec. 20 weekly update to the city staff. ?This will be the first time that the city?s maintenance crews have been simultaneously relocated in the city?s history,? Frank stated. ?This will be quite a demand on our crews for the first week or so while they settle into their new facilities.
NEWS
By STEVE KAWARATANI | January 26, 2007
"The weather is like the government, always in the wrong."  -- Jerome K. Jerome "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco." -- Mark Twain Gardeners face a myriad of challenges as cold nights have arrived with consistency. In certain Laguna climes (like the canyon), there is the possibility of frost damage to ornamentals and fruit trees. Unanticipated wet and cold weather conditions may damage strawberries, early tomatoes and basil.
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FEATURES
December 25, 2009
Alternative Market a big success Neighborhood Congregational Church?s Alternative Christmas Market, sponsored over two weekends by JOY Ministry (Justice, Outreach and You), featured 14 organizations, Creations by Clara Lee and the Laguna Beach Resource Center Adopt-A-Family Program, in addition to NCC Kids. The grand total for purchases was $6,079, according to the church. The NCC Kids, under the direction of Mary LaRusso, sold $85 worth of reindeer and snowman ?poop?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | July 17, 2009
A combination of recession economics, a rising awareness of the healthy benefits of organic produce and a growing appreciation for the taste of the freshest fruits and vegetables locally grown has spurred a mass movement of home vegetable gardening, similar to the victory gardens of World War II. Last year, a record number of Americans experimented with growing vegetables to offset rising food prices. The Burpee seed company did a study that confirmed that there is a cost-saving ratio of 1:25 for growing your own vegetables rather than buying them at the supermarket.
NEWS
By STEVE KAWARATANI | January 27, 2006
"Plants which branch out widely are often more flourishing for a little timely pruning." -- with apologies to Thomas Babington Macaulay The question arises every winter: Why prune? Left to their own devices, many plants will grow wildly, unchecked and unproductive. The object of pruning, which in Plant Man parlance translates to cutting or trimming, is to modify plant growth. But before we set off to prune our roses or fruit trees, let's review how plants grow. All plants grow or elongate themselves by producing new growth at sites we call buds.
NEWS
January 17, 2003
THE GARDEN FANATIC "This bud's for you." -- anonymous "Plants, which branch out widely are often more flourishing for a little timely pruning." -- with apologies to Thomas Babington Macaulay The question arises every January, "Why prune?" Left to their own devices, many plants will grow wildly, unchecked and unproductive. The object of pruning -- cutting or trimming -- is to modify plant growth. But before we set off to prune our roses or fruit trees, let's review how plants grow.
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