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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Breeding | March 12, 2010
Art lovers will have an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of glass blowing with veteran glass-smith and Sawdust exhibitor Loren Chapman in a hands-on workshop this weekend as part of the Sawdust Festival?s Spring Into Art workshop series. Spring Into Art offers a wide variety of media including painting in acrylics and oils, fabric collage, mixed-media collage, watercolor painting, ceramics, flower arranging and more. Internationally renowned for his abstractionist ?free-form?
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | August 25, 2011
Glass is a mysterious substance. I never realized how interesting it was until I took a class in fused glass from Maggie Spencer, a Sawdust artist. Glass, as Maggie explained to our small "Girls Night Out" class, is neither liquid nor solid. It's "amorphous," or formless. Yet glass is one of the most common substances in our lives. If you look around, you'll see at least two to three, or more, forms of glass on your wall, on your desk, on your kitchen table. It's not "formless" at all; it's able to take many forms.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
Suzie Harrison Who hasn't dreamed of being an artist at the Sawdust Art Festival? Now there's an opportunity to explore that desire with the Sawdust Art Festival's "Spring Into Art" weekend art workshops. Starting March 12 and continuing March 13, 19 and 20, aspiring artists can create in a variety of artistic media at the Sawdust with the expert help of its professional exhibiting artists. During the Sawdust's summer and winter shows crowds gather at the glass blowing demonstration booth, fascinated by the process and the artwork produced by the glass artists.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
BOBBIE ALLEN The cultural evolution of glass coincides exactly with the evolution of human culture. Its earliest examples serendipitously occur alongside the first examples of architecture, literature, and music -- some dating back to 3500 BC. And although modern art glass has grown to take full advantage of such technological developments as electric heating elements and gas furnaces, the blown vase that you ...
NEWS
By Candice Baker | June 14, 2007
The artist team commissioned to create the city's most expensive Art in Public Places project to date is surmounting challenges to put the final touches on its design. John Barber, Louis Longi and Bill Howard created two art elements for the former Act V parking area on Laguna Canyon Road, which is being converted to the city's corporate yard and a public parking lot. Longi sculpted three bronze figures for the piece; two will hold a glass bench designed by Barber between them.
NEWS
By: Suzie Harrison | August 26, 2005
Laguna Beach prides itself on being an artist colony, where a spectrum of art genres thrive -- but who knew the performance art of beer pouring could fit into that category? This art form will be featured at 5 p.m. Tuesday when Brussels Bistro owner Alain Pauwels and manager John John McEvilly, both Belgium natives, compete to see who has perfected the art of beer pouring. They will represent Laguna Beach in the Orange County qualifier for the Stella Artois World Draught Master Competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | May 8, 2008
When Laguna artist Jorge Burtin retired young from his family plastics business, he found he had a lot of time on his hands. He now spends his days creating what he calls Pixaics, mosaics of thousands of tiny pieces of pigmented glass, like the pixels on a computer screen; 25 of them can fit into a square-inch area. “I switched one job for the other,” he said. Each piece of Burtin’s art sells for tens of thousands of dollars, but Burtin requires buyers to write a check for the purchase amount to a charity of their choice — not to Burtin himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | August 25, 2006
It draws you in, with graceful lines and sparkling luminosity. Human faces are barely distinguishable in its wings. It is a thing of beauty. But this lithe creature kills an African child every 30 seconds. Laguna Beach artist Leslie Davis' glass and steel depiction of a mosquito is one of four sculptures at her new exhibition, "Worlds in Collision: Art, Death and Alternative Medical Science in the Global Community," showing through Sunday at the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in Santa Ana. Along with Davis' brother Gregg Stone of Laguna Niguel, Laguna Beach's Pat Sparkuhl is also represented in the installation with 27 pieces.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
Suzie Harrison Though the Sawdust Art Festival's 212 artists are the main attraction, music and entertainment abound every hour, seven days a week, during the summer show. "The Sawdust has three stages of live entertainment pretty much all the time, so you can see live entertainment any time you're here," community and media relations manger Rebecca Meekma said. "We have over 100 different acts -- rock and roll, jazz, zydeco, all kinds of music and entertainment acts."
NEWS
By Cherril Doty | September 10, 2012
The crowd noise is gone. Birds coo and chirp in the tall trees. A gentle breeze rustles their leaves. There is a faint whoosh coming from the glassblowing furnace. The Sunday morning sounds on the Sawdust Art Festival grounds are only soft ones. An early morning walk along the shore with stand-up paddleboarders galore - the most I've seen all summer - started this wonderful day. Hard to believe it was a work day for me. The festival season may be over, but managing the year-round Sawdust Studio Art Classes goes on. Work?
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NEWS
By Cherril Doty | September 10, 2012
The crowd noise is gone. Birds coo and chirp in the tall trees. A gentle breeze rustles their leaves. There is a faint whoosh coming from the glassblowing furnace. The Sunday morning sounds on the Sawdust Art Festival grounds are only soft ones. An early morning walk along the shore with stand-up paddleboarders galore - the most I've seen all summer - started this wonderful day. Hard to believe it was a work day for me. The festival season may be over, but managing the year-round Sawdust Studio Art Classes goes on. Work?
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NEWS
By Alisha Gomez, Special to the Coastline Pilot | May 3, 2012
Thirty-four-year-old Van de la Plante looks every bit the gentleman. Sporting a beige linen resort suit, a green Cuban Guayabera cigar shirt and Huarache Cole Haan sandals, de la Plante fits in well as owner of Gentlemen's Breakfast, a new boutique that sells antique eye glasses, sunglasses and accessories at 1968 S. Coast Hwy. The small shop, splattered in bitter chocolate and beige tones, is decorated with manly finds and furnishings....
NEWS
By Joanna Clay | November 10, 2011
The Townley Gallery reported a sculpture was stolen Friday evening, and the gallery's owner believes it could be connected to other art thefts in the area. According to police and the gallery, a man walked into the gallery at 570 S. Coast Hwy. around 7 p.m. and grabbed a sculpture when owner Shane Townley had his back to him. Townley said he was giving a couple directions to a nearby restaurant when the man slipped in without his knowledge and then left with the artwork. The stolen glass sculpture by artist Patrick Blythe is valued at $2,000.
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | August 25, 2011
Glass is a mysterious substance. I never realized how interesting it was until I took a class in fused glass from Maggie Spencer, a Sawdust artist. Glass, as Maggie explained to our small "Girls Night Out" class, is neither liquid nor solid. It's "amorphous," or formless. Yet glass is one of the most common substances in our lives. If you look around, you'll see at least two to three, or more, forms of glass on your wall, on your desk, on your kitchen table. It's not "formless" at all; it's able to take many forms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Breeding | March 12, 2010
Art lovers will have an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of glass blowing with veteran glass-smith and Sawdust exhibitor Loren Chapman in a hands-on workshop this weekend as part of the Sawdust Festival?s Spring Into Art workshop series. Spring Into Art offers a wide variety of media including painting in acrylics and oils, fabric collage, mixed-media collage, watercolor painting, ceramics, flower arranging and more. Internationally renowned for his abstractionist ?free-form?
LOCAL
By Cherril Doty | January 29, 2010
“The benefits of optimism cannot be overstated, even by an optimist.” — Melvin Durai The waves seemed to launch themselves at the shoreline. Roiling white foam was a stunning backdrop to the swoop and glide of pelicans and cormorants. On the rocky shore gulls and a lone pair of yellow-legged black oystercatchers shouted encouragement to the intrepid divers, perhaps hoping to enjoy some leftovers themselves. On this day between storms, the sea lions basked on the offshore rocks in the sun, content for the moment to simply rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | May 8, 2008
When Laguna artist Jorge Burtin retired young from his family plastics business, he found he had a lot of time on his hands. He now spends his days creating what he calls Pixaics, mosaics of thousands of tiny pieces of pigmented glass, like the pixels on a computer screen; 25 of them can fit into a square-inch area. “I switched one job for the other,” he said. Each piece of Burtin’s art sells for tens of thousands of dollars, but Burtin requires buyers to write a check for the purchase amount to a charity of their choice — not to Burtin himself.
NEWS
By Tom Titus | April 11, 2008
The play that introduced Tennessee Williams to the theatergoing world, ?The Glass Menagerie,? is receiving an excellent production in Laguna Beach from the Gallimaufry Performing Arts company. Delicately staged by director Steve Josephson, as befits its fragile memory play status, this 1944 gem sparkles anew, bolstered by four beautifully realized performances. ?The Glass Menagerie? is Williams? account of his early days of emotional and economic privation in St. Louis with his onetime Southern belle mother and his slightly crippled sister (whose eventual lobotomy inspired Williams?
NEWS
By Candice Baker | March 28, 2008
The love of Tennessee Williams is more than scholarly in the Josephson household. Steve Josephson, the executive artistic director of Gallimaufry Performing Arts, was ?blown away? the first time he saw his future wife Julie; she was performing as Blanche Dubois in Williams? ?A Streetcar Named Desire? at the 1982 Edinburgh Festival. Josephson is now directing his wife in Gallimaufry?s production of Williams? ?The Glass Menagerie.? ?It just absolutely seemed like the time,?
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