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Marine Life Protection Act

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NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | November 11, 2009
Fishing or lobster catching off most of Laguna Beach could soon be illegal. Six miles of Laguna Beach coastline could be declared a “no take” zone for any form of living marine life under a recommendation approved Tuesday by the Marine Life Protection Act Blue Ribbon Task Force. If the task force proposal for a State Marine Reserve is adopted by the Fish and Game Commission, the coast from Crystal Cove State Park south to Aliso Beach would be off-limits to fishermen from the beach to about three miles out to sea, according to MLPA Initiative spokeswoman Annelore Reisewitz.
NEWS
By Christine Hynes | December 29, 2011
I always enjoy my morning walks on the beach, but my winter strolls are particularly special. It's a great time of year for wildlife viewing — just the other day I watched as an intrepid seal took a lengthy trip up onto the beach — and the summer crowds seem like a distant memory. Yet as I walk the beach these days, I'm weighed down by worry over the health of the ocean, which seems to be in perpetual decline. The world's coral reefs are dying off at a frightening pace, and along the coast of California, the fish that call Laguna Cove and our other nearby waters home are becoming smaller and fewer with each passing year.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
In a highly anticipated decision, the California Fish & Game Commission this week approved a strict set of new rules for what can and cannot take place on the shores and in the coastal waters off of Southern California, from Santa Barbara to the Mexican border. The rules, mandated by the decade old Marine Life Protection Act, are designed to conserve sea life and preserve the marine environment. But the commission's 3-2 vote shows that not all are convinced of the need or efficacy of such rules.
NEWS
By Catharine Cooper | May 23, 2008
The Marine Life Protection Act was signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis in early 1999. What the law did was direct the state to design and manage a network of protected marine areas, including an improved marine reserve component to protect marine life and habitats, marine ecosystems, natural marine heritage, as well as improve recreational, educational and study opportunities. There are three types of marine protected areas (MPAs) that can be established: ?state marine reserves, which prohibit recreational fishing and all other forms of recreational and commercial ?
NEWS
October 15, 2009
Overview The Marine Life Protection Act requires California to reevaluate all existing marine protected areas and potentially design new areas that function as parts of a statewide network. A regional approach is being used to redesign protected areas along California’s 1,100-mile coast, with the state divided into five study regions. The South Coast Study Region includes state waters between Point Conception in Santa Barbara County to the California border with Mexico in San Diego County, including all offshore islands.
NEWS
By Cindalee Penney-Hall | May 26, 2006
I want to thank you for your excellent editorial and cartoon in support of tide-pool protection. Those of us who are in the trenches appreciate your spreading the word. Our tide pools are unique areas of rare biological diversity and truly singular beauty. In fact, the state of California has deemed them ? and indeed, much of the Laguna Beach coastline ? worthy of protection by law. The tide pools at Heisler are part of the Heisler Park State Marine Life Reserve. In enacting the Marine Life Protection Act, the Legislature declared, "Marine-life reserves are an essential element of an MPA system because they protect habitat and ecosystems, conserve biological diversity, and provide a sanctuary for fish and other sea life."
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NEWS
By Christine Hynes | December 29, 2011
I always enjoy my morning walks on the beach, but my winter strolls are particularly special. It's a great time of year for wildlife viewing — just the other day I watched as an intrepid seal took a lengthy trip up onto the beach — and the summer crowds seem like a distant memory. Yet as I walk the beach these days, I'm weighed down by worry over the health of the ocean, which seems to be in perpetual decline. The world's coral reefs are dying off at a frightening pace, and along the coast of California, the fish that call Laguna Cove and our other nearby waters home are becoming smaller and fewer with each passing year.
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NEWS
By Donna Kalez | January 6, 2011
I run the day-to-day operations of Dana Wharf Sportfishing and Whale Watching in Dana Point Harbor. My family has had this business in Dana Point Harbor since 1971, and we have been fishing the Laguna Beach area since the 1950s when our business was located off the San Clemente pier. I think it is accurate to say our experienced captains and crews who fish the area daily understand this coastal area and its marine resources better than most. They fish these areas year-round and have fished through good years and bad. It is important to know that this is our livelihood and we try to protect and conserve the areas we fish and always have.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond, coastlinepilot@latimes.com | December 16, 2010
Recreational and commercial fishing will be banned along Laguna's coastline under strict rules adopted Wednesday by the California Fish and Game Commission The commission voted 3-2 on Wednesday to adopt a network of marine protected areas, often called MPAs, along the Southern California coast. Newly protected areas from the Mexican border to Santa Barbara will connect with the existing network from Santa Barbara to the Mendocino County coast. "I am very pleased by the decision," said Councilwoman Verna Rollinger, who attended all but one of the commission hearings held during the past year.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
In a highly anticipated decision, the California Fish & Game Commission this week approved a strict set of new rules for what can and cannot take place on the shores and in the coastal waters off of Southern California, from Santa Barbara to the Mexican border. The rules, mandated by the decade old Marine Life Protection Act, are designed to conserve sea life and preserve the marine environment. But the commission's 3-2 vote shows that not all are convinced of the need or efficacy of such rules.
NEWS
By Dave Connell | December 25, 2009
All the people writing letters and appearing at the Marine Life Protection Act meetings pleading to close off much of the coast to fishing often base their opinions on a few years of personal observation or biased inputs from paid so-called marine scientists. These people hedge their positions by saying, ?Based on best available science.? That is an impressive way for the scientists avoiding saying, ?This is what we think;? or saying, ?this is what we are getting paid to come up with.
NEWS
December 11, 2009
And so we wait. The future of the coast off of Laguna Beach has moved behind the scenes with the completion of a public process for the Marine Life Protection Act. The state Fish and Game Commission received testimony Wednesday on the Blue Ribbon Task Force-approved proposal for a partial ?no-take? zone in Laguna, but did not make a final decision. While the gears of government turn, we want to make it clear: A sweeping ban off Laguna ? when even Crystal Cove would remain open ?
NEWS
November 20, 2009
It?s time to pump up the volume of our beach and tidepool protection. The Marine Life Protection Act is determining actual designations, but we as a city need to focus on who is or should be designated to officially give citations for infractions. Signs at each end of town and media notification will simply not do. There are not enough officials allowed to actually ?cite? offenders and issue fines ? only our police and Marine Protection Officer Calla Allison. Beach patrol, lifeguards, docents, et al can only ?
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | November 11, 2009
Fishing or lobster catching off most of Laguna Beach could soon be illegal. Six miles of Laguna Beach coastline could be declared a “no take” zone for any form of living marine life under a recommendation approved Tuesday by the Marine Life Protection Act Blue Ribbon Task Force. If the task force proposal for a State Marine Reserve is adopted by the Fish and Game Commission, the coast from Crystal Cove State Park south to Aliso Beach would be off-limits to fishermen from the beach to about three miles out to sea, according to MLPA Initiative spokeswoman Annelore Reisewitz.
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