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LOCAL
By James Pribram | May 7, 2009
I’m here walking along the Grand River in Grand Haven, Mich. It’s 10:36 a.m. with a cold breeze blowing in off of the river, and a bank of fog is sitting just a bit farther out. The smoke bellows from atop an old factory just to the north with no one in sight, except for the little birdies flying in circles around me and the odd salmon that jump periodically as their splashes echo in surround sound. I feel like I’m reliving a moment in time that has been captured before in an old novel or the movie “A River Runs Through It.” Even though I can’t really remember it. Time is at a standstill, and I am OK with it. Sometimes life at home seems to be going so fast — too fast for that matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sherwood Kiraly | February 27, 2009
Over near the fire road from the Top of the World neighborhood to Arch Beach Heights, there’s an outcropping, a knob of rock with a couple of indentations in it, two curved shelves shaped like beanbag chairs, overlooking Laguna and the ocean. Our dog Booker knows the southernmost of these as the Sit Rock. Patti Jo and I each found it independently while walking him, and we’ve both sat on it often. It’s possible we’re not supposed to — the whole world, after all, is someone’s property — but lots of people have.
NEWS
January 17, 2003
WHAT'S SO FUNNY Laguna, to those who find their way here after years of living elsewhere, is a kind of heaven. And one of its heavenly characteristics is its near-total freedom from flies and mosquitoes. I spent my boyhood summers in an old house by the Mississippi River, where I once swatted 114 flies in a day and then gave up. No question, Laguna is heaven by comparison. And yet, it can't really be heaven. Not with all these ants. The encyclopedia says ants eat leaves, honeydew and other invertebrates.
NEWS
May 16, 2003
Tom Titus Certain works of literature, after multiple readings, tend to insinuate themselves in the memory, and for me, Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" is a sterling example. A good half-century after I put down the book for the last time, Twain's narrative strikes a most familiar chord upon viewing the Laguna Playhouse Youth Theater's adaptation of the children's classic. The characters, the situations and the dialogue are virtually unchanged in the Laguna production.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 17, 2009
The life of David Young will be celebrated at 10 a.m. July 27 at Tivoli Terrace on the Festival of Arts grounds, to which he gave his heart, his intellect and his time for more than five decades. Young died Monday of natural causes. He was 96. Best known for his leadership in promoting the arts, Young was also a pillar of the business community, a builder born and bred. A soft-spoken, courtly gentleman who never lost the gentle accent of his Tennessee birthplace, Young joined the festival board in 1954 and served more than 50 years, with one brief hiatus when he quit to protest efforts by the board majority to relocate the festival and Pageant of the Masters to San Clemente.
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LOCAL
By James Pribram | May 7, 2009
I’m here walking along the Grand River in Grand Haven, Mich. It’s 10:36 a.m. with a cold breeze blowing in off of the river, and a bank of fog is sitting just a bit farther out. The smoke bellows from atop an old factory just to the north with no one in sight, except for the little birdies flying in circles around me and the odd salmon that jump periodically as their splashes echo in surround sound. I feel like I’m reliving a moment in time that has been captured before in an old novel or the movie “A River Runs Through It.” Even though I can’t really remember it. Time is at a standstill, and I am OK with it. Sometimes life at home seems to be going so fast — too fast for that matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sherwood Kiraly | February 27, 2009
Over near the fire road from the Top of the World neighborhood to Arch Beach Heights, there’s an outcropping, a knob of rock with a couple of indentations in it, two curved shelves shaped like beanbag chairs, overlooking Laguna and the ocean. Our dog Booker knows the southernmost of these as the Sit Rock. Patti Jo and I each found it independently while walking him, and we’ve both sat on it often. It’s possible we’re not supposed to — the whole world, after all, is someone’s property — but lots of people have.
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