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NEWS
November 14, 2003
Steve Kawaratani "Teachers are never fully appreciated by parents until it rains all day Saturday." -- ANONYMOUS "Raindrops keep falling on my head." -- B. J. THOMAS As a reminder, rain is a drop of water falling from the sky. Its early appearance is a good thing in Laguna, unless one is involved in the early stages of construction of a house or digging around in a watercourse. For the many native plants that cover our hillsides, rain is the crucial element, also affecting the quality of our lives in town and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | October 30, 2009
“Teachers are never fully appreciated by parents until it rains all day Saturday.” — Anonymous As a reminder, rain is a drop of water falling from the sky. Its early appearance was a good thing for Laguna, unless one was in the early stages of building a house or mucking around in a watercourse. For the many native plants that cover our hillsides, rain is the crucial element, also affecting the quality of our lives in the village and beyond. Native plants are a better choice for many gardens.
NEWS
By ELISABETH M. BROWN | February 23, 2007
The unusually cold weather of a few weeks ago may be gone, but its effects are still with us. I'm referring to the dead leaves on garden plants. Around my neighborhood, the tender leaves of the non-native ground cover have turned brown. The outer leaves of the neighbor's rubber tree are bleached yellow. Freezing temperatures kill leaves by freezing the water inside. The ice crystals disrupt the cells, and the structure collapses as the ice melts. Needles of evergreen trees like pines and firs contain natural compounds that act like antifreeze, so they survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | February 13, 2009
Prior to the past few storms, it appeared that this season was destined to be relatively dry. With the memory of the last drought not that many years removed, we should remember that water is an extremely influential element, affecting the pattern and quality of our life in Laguna. As growing population demands are placed on our uncertain water supply, we can clearly see that water is not available in unlimited quantities. Lack of water means fewer plants, or plants that require less water.
NEWS
July 9, 2004
ELISABETH M. BROWN Ah, summer, when most of us want to minimize chores and maximize fun. This is the time of year to practice some guilt-free neglect: Keep up the watering, but forget the tidying up. I espouse messy gardens not just because I have too little time, but also because small wildlife prefers more "natural" appearing spaces. Leave some leaf litter on the ground. Wilderness isn't very neat, but it provides lots of resources for birds, salamanders and lizards -- the seeds and insects that accumulate under leaf litter.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
The Laguna Beach County Water District is holding a SmartScape Info/Expo from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at its headquarters, 306 Third St., Laguna Beach. The free event promotes the benefits of using California native plants and efficient irrigation techniques in residential and commercial landscape settings. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with landscape and irrigation professionals, attend hands-on demonstrations and free workshops, and meet representatives from local companies exhibiting the latest water efficient landscape products.
NEWS
By ELISABETH M. BROWN | June 16, 2006
It's wildflower time: the hills are painted with yellow, and newspapers print pictures of orange poppies, blue lupines, and yellow (uh-oh) mustard. I like spring color, but I wince at all those mustard flowers, because it means we have a long way to go to restore our hillsides. Many of our parks and preserves are land recovering from a century of cattle and sheep grazing. Instead of native vegetation, the landscape is dominated by introduced grasses and weeds. One of these is Black Mustard, beloved by many because of its exuberant flowering, but still a weed.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | August 22, 2012
Converting a couple of undevelopable city-owned lots to mini parks was Ken Franks' brainchild, but Laguna Beach landscape architect Bob Borthwick made it a reality. Mayor Jane Egly and Mayor Pro Tem Verna Rollinger cut the ribbon Aug. 16 for the Park Avenue View Park, the second one designed by Borthwick on a less than lavish budget. It is different by design from the first park located off of Laguna Canyon Road. "Ken came up with the idea for the parks about three years ago," Borthwick said.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 11, 2012
The city has traded in two empty lots for neighborhood mini parks this summer. The Park Avenue View Park is scheduled to be dedicated next week, less than a month after Woodland Drive folks celebrated the opening of the Frontage Road Mini Park that fronts their neighborhood. "The difference in the parks is the locale," said Bob Borthwick, who designed the linear spaces in tandem, working with a very small budget. Borthwick said the hillside park was former City Manager Ken Frank's idea.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | December 8, 2006
St. Mary's Episcopal Church at 428 Park Ave. won approval of a controversial project Tuesday on a technicality. The City Council split 2-2 on a motion to deny an appeal of the church's proposed replacement for its badly deteriorated Guild Hall. A tie vote is an automatic "no," which meant approval of the plans for the project, which was dramatically revised after church and neighbors met with aid of a professional mediator. Councilwomen Elizabeth Pearson-Schneider voted with council newcomer Kelly Boyd to deny the appeal.
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NEWS
By Bryce Alderton | October 31, 2013
Landscape architects and Laguna Beach planning commissioners are working to give the city's landscape-related policies teeth. The Landscape and Scenic Highways Element Committee's goal is to consolidate two existing documents that focus on landscape and scenic highways into one unified section of the city's general plan. "This element [document] seeks to create a long-term comprehensive plan that highlights the significance of our picturesque natural setting and unique artistic heritage," reads a description on the city's website . The group includes lead consultant Greg Vail, a former Laguna Beach planning commissioner, current commission Chairman Robert Zur Schmiede, Commissioner Anne Johnson, landscape architects Ann Christoph and Robert Borthwick, and Assistant City Planner Belinda Ann Deines.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | August 22, 2012
Converting a couple of undevelopable city-owned lots to mini parks was Ken Franks' brainchild, but Laguna Beach landscape architect Bob Borthwick made it a reality. Mayor Jane Egly and Mayor Pro Tem Verna Rollinger cut the ribbon Aug. 16 for the Park Avenue View Park, the second one designed by Borthwick on a less than lavish budget. It is different by design from the first park located off of Laguna Canyon Road. "Ken came up with the idea for the parks about three years ago," Borthwick said.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | July 11, 2012
The city has traded in two empty lots for neighborhood mini parks this summer. The Park Avenue View Park is scheduled to be dedicated next week, less than a month after Woodland Drive folks celebrated the opening of the Frontage Road Mini Park that fronts their neighborhood. "The difference in the parks is the locale," said Bob Borthwick, who designed the linear spaces in tandem, working with a very small budget. Borthwick said the hillside park was former City Manager Ken Frank's idea.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
The Laguna Beach County Water District is holding a SmartScape Info/Expo from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at its headquarters, 306 Third St., Laguna Beach. The free event promotes the benefits of using California native plants and efficient irrigation techniques in residential and commercial landscape settings. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with landscape and irrigation professionals, attend hands-on demonstrations and free workshops, and meet representatives from local companies exhibiting the latest water efficient landscape products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | October 30, 2009
“Teachers are never fully appreciated by parents until it rains all day Saturday.” — Anonymous As a reminder, rain is a drop of water falling from the sky. Its early appearance was a good thing for Laguna, unless one was in the early stages of building a house or mucking around in a watercourse. For the many native plants that cover our hillsides, rain is the crucial element, also affecting the quality of our lives in the village and beyond. Native plants are a better choice for many gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kawaratani | February 13, 2009
Prior to the past few storms, it appeared that this season was destined to be relatively dry. With the memory of the last drought not that many years removed, we should remember that water is an extremely influential element, affecting the pattern and quality of our life in Laguna. As growing population demands are placed on our uncertain water supply, we can clearly see that water is not available in unlimited quantities. Lack of water means fewer plants, or plants that require less water.
NEWS
By ELISABETH M. BROWN | February 23, 2007
The unusually cold weather of a few weeks ago may be gone, but its effects are still with us. I'm referring to the dead leaves on garden plants. Around my neighborhood, the tender leaves of the non-native ground cover have turned brown. The outer leaves of the neighbor's rubber tree are bleached yellow. Freezing temperatures kill leaves by freezing the water inside. The ice crystals disrupt the cells, and the structure collapses as the ice melts. Needles of evergreen trees like pines and firs contain natural compounds that act like antifreeze, so they survive.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | December 8, 2006
St. Mary's Episcopal Church at 428 Park Ave. won approval of a controversial project Tuesday on a technicality. The City Council split 2-2 on a motion to deny an appeal of the church's proposed replacement for its badly deteriorated Guild Hall. A tie vote is an automatic "no," which meant approval of the plans for the project, which was dramatically revised after church and neighbors met with aid of a professional mediator. Councilwomen Elizabeth Pearson-Schneider voted with council newcomer Kelly Boyd to deny the appeal.
NEWS
By ELISABETH M. BROWN | June 16, 2006
It's wildflower time: the hills are painted with yellow, and newspapers print pictures of orange poppies, blue lupines, and yellow (uh-oh) mustard. I like spring color, but I wince at all those mustard flowers, because it means we have a long way to go to restore our hillsides. Many of our parks and preserves are land recovering from a century of cattle and sheep grazing. Instead of native vegetation, the landscape is dominated by introduced grasses and weeds. One of these is Black Mustard, beloved by many because of its exuberant flowering, but still a weed.
NEWS
July 9, 2004
ELISABETH M. BROWN Ah, summer, when most of us want to minimize chores and maximize fun. This is the time of year to practice some guilt-free neglect: Keep up the watering, but forget the tidying up. I espouse messy gardens not just because I have too little time, but also because small wildlife prefers more "natural" appearing spaces. Leave some leaf litter on the ground. Wilderness isn't very neat, but it provides lots of resources for birds, salamanders and lizards -- the seeds and insects that accumulate under leaf litter.
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