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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 14, 2009
Water supplies are drying up, and the Laguna Beach County Water District has floated a plan to keep city taps flowing without waste — or pay the price. A handful of residents responded to a district invitation to attend a hearing Tuesday on a proposed ordinance that will affect every customer in Laguna — providing for conservation that ranges from voluntary reductions in water use to three levels of mandatory rationing and enforcement. “The goal is to optimize efficiency even when there is no water shortage,” Assistant General Manager Christopher Regan said.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 7, 2009
The Laguna Beach County Water District wants to hear the community’s comments on a proposed water-saving ordinance. A public hearing will be at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, at the district office, 360 Third St. The meeting will be conducted by the Water Commission, as approved by the City Council, acting as the district board of directors. “All of Laguna’s water is imported and the supplies are being drastically curtailed,” said Renae Hinchey, district general manager.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 7, 2008
Water supplies are dwindling throughout California, but Laguna is particularly vulnerable, water district officials said Monday at the Laguna Canyon Conservancy meeting. All of Laguna’s water is imported, which puts it at the mercy of suppliers who dictate the allotment to the city. District officials are looking at ways to find or develop new water sources for the long term, but the short-term view is grim, including the Damocles Sword of mandatory rationing. “The water crisis is real,” said Renae Hinchey, general manager of the Laguna Beach County Water District, which services customers north of Nyes Place and in Emerald Bay. Recent rainfall is a drop in the bucket needed to alleviate the long-term reduction in water supplied to Southern California by allotments from the Colorado River or from Northern California, via the Metropolitan Water District.
LOCAL
By Cindy Frazier | July 8, 2008
The Laguna Beach County Water District is urging water customers to immediately reduce their water usage by another 10%, following Gov. Schwarzenegger’s declaration of a statewide drought in June, said Christopher Regan, district spokesman. Regan said the call to save more water also comes on the heels of the Metropolitan Water District’s issuance of a “water supply alert,” signaling that water reserves in Southern California are being depleted, and that, if water usage is not reduced, the region is likely to see shortages and rationing in the near future.
NEWS
May 15, 2009
The water situation is getting serious, especially for Laguna Beach, a city which relies entirely on imported water. The Metropolitan Water District has told the local water agencies that it will reduce water allotments by 9% next year — and if the agencies want to purchase more than that, the price will more than double. The Laguna Beach County Water District is warning consumers that the extra cost will be passed on, and putting Lagunans on notice that water is no longer to be taken for granted.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 29, 2008
Laguna Beach County Water District officials announced a $150,000 pledge to study the prospects of a regional ocean desalinization plant in Dana Point Monday. Desalinization ? filtering salt from ocean water to make it potable ? is seen by the district as the most practicable means to reduce its reliance on imported water. ?The district?s board and commission have long considered desalinization a viable water supply option of Laguna Beach,? said Renae Hinchey, general manager of the county water district.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 27, 2008
Laguna Beach County Water District officials announced Monday a $150,000 pledge to study the prospects of a regional ocean desalinization plant in Dana Point. Desalinization — filtering salt from ocean water to make it potable — is seen by the district as the most practicable means to reduce its reliance on imported water. “The district’s board and commission have long considered desalinization a viable water supply option of Laguna Beach,” said Renae Hinchy, general manager of the county water district.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 14, 2009
Water supplies are drying up, and the Laguna Beach County Water District has floated a plan to keep city taps flowing without waste — or pay the price. A handful of residents responded to a district invitation to attend a hearing Tuesday on a proposed ordinance that will affect every customer in Laguna — providing for conservation that ranges from voluntary reductions in water use to three levels of mandatory rationing and enforcement. “The goal is to optimize efficiency even when there is no water shortage,” Assistant General Manager Christopher Regan said.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | May 7, 2009
The Laguna Beach County Water District wants to hear the community’s comments on a proposed water-saving ordinance. A public hearing will be at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, at the district office, 360 Third St. The meeting will be conducted by the Water Commission, as approved by the City Council, acting as the district board of directors. “All of Laguna’s water is imported and the supplies are being drastically curtailed,” said Renae Hinchey, district general manager.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 7, 2008
Water supplies are dwindling throughout California, but Laguna is particularly vulnerable, water district officials said Monday at the Laguna Canyon Conservancy meeting. All of Laguna’s water is imported, which puts it at the mercy of suppliers who dictate the allotment to the city. District officials are looking at ways to find or develop new water sources for the long term, but the short-term view is grim, including the Damocles Sword of mandatory rationing. “The water crisis is real,” said Renae Hinchey, general manager of the Laguna Beach County Water District, which services customers north of Nyes Place and in Emerald Bay. Recent rainfall is a drop in the bucket needed to alleviate the long-term reduction in water supplied to Southern California by allotments from the Colorado River or from Northern California, via the Metropolitan Water District.
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