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NEWS
April 29, 2005
Three-hundred feet of coastline surrounding Anita Street was closed Thursday morning after a power outage caused pump stations to break down, said Monica Mazur of Orange County Environmental Health. Five pump stations stopped working when San Diego Gas and Electric, the power provider for these Laguna pump stations, experienced a power outage due to heavy rains, Mazur said. Between 45 and 50 gallons of sewage traveled with runoff into the surf, Mazur said.
NEWS
July 12, 2002
City sewer and county health department personnel got an early wake-up when a sewage spill was reported at Picnic Beach. The city received the call at 2 a.m. on Saturday, said Monica Mazur, an environmental specialist with the Orange County Department of Health. "It was a small spill and not much entered the surf zone," she said. Officials estimate that 100 gallons of sewage was spilled most of it seeping into the sand. Sewage overflowed into the basement and garage of an apartment complex due to a blocked line running to the building at 520 Cliff Drive.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | October 30, 2008
The city has hired outside consultants to determine the cause of a spill that spewed 580,000 gallons of sewage onto city streets and into the ocean Wednesday morning. City crews worked for more than eight hours to stem the flow of sewage from the Bluebird lift station at Glenneyre and Calliope streets. Coastal waters for two miles on either side of the spill — from Crescent Bay to the north and Camel Point to the south — were closed by the county Health Department and will remain closed until the bacteria count returns to normal limits.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | December 11, 2009
The long rehabilitation of the Bluebird sewage lift station is done. Work that was expected to be completed months ago was hampered by mishaps, mistakes and miscalculations — some due to the lack of accurate information on the construction of the aging facility. Modernizing and rehabilitating the city’s cranky sewage system has been a top priority for almost a decade, with about $16 million spent in just the past six or seven years. The Bluebird lift station project was at the top of the priority list.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 4, 2008
All waters off Laguna Beach were declared safe for swimmers at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday by the Orange County Health Department, after being closed since Oct. 29 due to a massive sewage spill that closed four miles of beach. The city has hired outside consultants to determine the cause of the spill that spewed 580,000 gallons of sewage onto city streets and into the ocean early Oct. 29. City crews worked for more than eight hours to stem the flow of sewage from the Bluebird lift station at Glenneyre and Calliope streets.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 5, 2008
All waters off Laguna Beach were declared safe for swimmers at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday by the Orange County Health Department, after being closed since Oct. 29 due to a massive sewage spill that closed four miles of beach. The city has hired outside consultants to determine the cause of the spill that spewed 580,000 gallons of sewage onto city streets and into the ocean early Oct. 29. City crews worked for more than eight hours to stem the flow of sewage from the Bluebird lift station at Glenneyre and Calliope streets.
LOCAL
By James Pribram | April 25, 2008
Here among the 100-foot trees in the hills of Santa Cruz, I sit and write to you. As the morning sun squeezes in between the tallest of trees before finding its way to the glistening ground, I imagine that every day, not just yesterday, is Earth Day here. Sadly it was last week, Thursday to be exact, that our town was again reminded just how vulnerable it really is. This time a sewer spill shut down the coast highway for nearly two days, sending traffic up and into the neighborhoods.
NEWS
October 31, 2008
Laguna Beach is reeling from a staggering half-million-gallon sewage spill that closed a 4-mile stretch of beach to swimming from 2:30 a.m. Wednesday through at least today. It?s believed to be the biggest spill in Southern California since a 2-million-gallon sewage leak in Manhattan Beach two years ago. It certainly is the largest since the last ?big? spill in Laguna, only six months ago, April 17, which closed the Coast Highway for 24 hours when a valve in the North Coast Interceptor ?
BUSINESS
August 4, 2006
Sewage leak forces 2-day closure of restaurant A leak in a sewage line forced the White House Restaurant to close Sunday through Tuesday while the problem was being fixed. According to owner George Catsouras, the property's main sewage line collapsed. The collapse occurred under Park Avenue, and was due to age. "It hurts business to close for two days in the middle of summer," he said. Disaster survival is topic at Business Exchange Kasey Eunice will discuss how to plan for a disaster using his Urban Tools survival kits at 7 a.m. Aug. 9 at the Coastal Business Exchange breakfast at the Jolly Roger Restaurant.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2014
A half-mile portion of coastline near Aliso Beach Park was reopened Wednesday afternoon, two days after a raw sewage spill, said Larry Honeybourne, the Orange County Health Care Agency's assistant director of environmental health. Agency officials tested water quality samples and determined they met state standards, Honeybourne said. Sewage was reported flowing out of a manhole cover at La Paz Road and Moulton Parkway in Laguna Hills at 3:10 a.m. Monday, Honeybourne said. The sewage flowed into storm drains and entered Aliso Creek, which empties into the ocean at county-owned Aliso Beach Park in South Laguna.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | March 6, 2014
Orange County Health Care Agency officials on Wednesday reopened about 2,000 feet of coastline around Blue Lagoon after a sewage spill Monday from a nearby mobile home park. A sewer line block at a residence in the Laguna Terrace mobile home park caused about 1,400 gallons of sewage to spill into the ocean, forcing the county to shut down the coastline to protect swimmers, surfers and divers, agency program manager Larry Honeybourne said. "We're salutarily mandated to close beaches to protect public health if in fact there's a discharge of raw sewage," he said.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
I am writing in regard to the foul smell of sewage around Laguna Beach. Lately the smell has been worse, and I have noticed it on Glenneyre Street and Forest Avenue but especially inside my house in the early-morning hours right before I wake up. It is so pungent that it can literally wake me from a sound sleep. It just so happens that the main sewer line for the entire town runs down the middle of Pacific Coast Highway, and one of the sewer vents used to exhaust the noxious gases is on Pacific Coast Highway right across the street from my home in Victoria Beach.
NEWS
By Michael Beanan | October 13, 2011
Anne Earhart's letter ("We can't ignore this global climate change," Sept. 30) adds another important voice to the relationship of ocean pollution, energy efficiency and global climate change. Every day, each of us contributes to a sewage system serving 232,000 residents from Emerald Bay and Laguna Beach to the Dana Point Headlands, plus another half dozen inland cities. Annually, 3.9 million visitors add their contributions. The Aliso Ocean Outfall, operating since Oct. 1 on an expired permit, discharges 15 mgd (million gallons per day)
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | December 11, 2009
The long rehabilitation of the Bluebird sewage lift station is done. Work that was expected to be completed months ago was hampered by mishaps, mistakes and miscalculations — some due to the lack of accurate information on the construction of the aging facility. Modernizing and rehabilitating the city’s cranky sewage system has been a top priority for almost a decade, with about $16 million spent in just the past six or seven years. The Bluebird lift station project was at the top of the priority list.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | August 28, 2009
City officials won’t appeal the fine assessed by state regulators for the Oct. 29 spill that spewed more than 590,000 gallons of sewage onto Woods Cove beaches. The state Regional Water Quality Control Board San Diego Region notified the city this week that a fine of $70,000 would be imposed, much lower than a maximum that could have been levied. Unless appealed it is a done deal city officials said. “There is nothing to stop a council member from appealing, but I would advise against it,” City Manager Ken Frank said.
LOCAL
By Roger von B├╝tow | August 24, 2009
Is The Laguna Beach City Manager Telling Residents The Truth About Our Sewage Spills? Laguna Beach City Manager Ken Frank, in his August 21st "Friday Update" posted on the website made the following assertion in his formal Press Release: "Last October, the City’s Bluebird sewer pump station developed an unpreventable piping malfunction and 590,000 gallons of sewage were released into the ocean." Here's the quote from the SDRWQCB Staff Report written by Joann Cofrancesco and Rebecca Stewart on August 18, 2009: Section 4.4 Degree of Culpability "The Discharger has a moderate degree of culpability for this spill.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 27, 2008
The October malfunction of the Bluebird lift station was costly in terms of money and the environment. About 500,000 gallons of sewage spewed onto the city beaches between the early hours of Oct. 29 when the alarm went off and the successful staunching of the flow. The cost of the emergency response and repair and recovery from the spill is estimated to cost $210,000, which was appropriated by the council at the Nov. 18 meeting. “We were able to reestablish service by 10 a.m., by the grace of God and one motor that continued to function despite being submerged,” said David Shissler, city director of water quality.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 5, 2008
All waters off Laguna Beach were declared safe for swimmers at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday by the Orange County Health Department, after being closed since Oct. 29 due to a massive sewage spill that closed four miles of beach. The city has hired outside consultants to determine the cause of the spill that spewed 580,000 gallons of sewage onto city streets and into the ocean early Oct. 29. City crews worked for more than eight hours to stem the flow of sewage from the Bluebird lift station at Glenneyre and Calliope streets.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | November 4, 2008
All waters off Laguna Beach were declared safe for swimmers at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday by the Orange County Health Department, after being closed since Oct. 29 due to a massive sewage spill that closed four miles of beach. The city has hired outside consultants to determine the cause of the spill that spewed 580,000 gallons of sewage onto city streets and into the ocean early Oct. 29. City crews worked for more than eight hours to stem the flow of sewage from the Bluebird lift station at Glenneyre and Calliope streets.
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