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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 14, 2013
The City Council delayed a vote Tuesday on plans to separate the solids from waste water at the coastal treatment plant. Council members were split 2-2 on the recommendation by city staff to replace the existing line that pumps the solids — called sludge — to a regional treatment plant. Mayor Kelly Boyd and Councilwoman Toni Iseman, the city's representative on the South Orange County Wastewater Authority, which oversees the coastal plant, favored the recommendation. Councilmen Bob Whalen and Steven Dicterow sided with environmentalists who opposed it. But all agreed to hold off a vote until Mayor Pro Tem Elizabeth Pearson, who was ailing, was back on the dais.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 7, 2013
An aging and decrepit pipe that carries solid waste through parkland from the coastal treatment plant to the regional treatment plant will be replaced, despite environmental concerns. The City Council voted 4-1 on Tuesday for the project, which was recommended by the South Orange County Wastewater Authority as the most feasible in terms of funding, longevity and urgency to avoid a catastrophic spill from the deteriorating pipe along Aliso Creek. "Replacing the pipe is the right project," said Betty Burnett, assistant general manager and district counsel for the South Coast Water District, which is one of the four agencies including the city of Laguna that are participating in the project.
NEWS
By Sharon Larimer | March 27, 2009
The Laguna Beach City Council vote and commitment to find a greener, ecological alternative to the SUPER project for Aliso Creek is the right action. A multifaceted approach to directly reduce storm water flows into Aliso Creek by installing cisterns and modernizing the sewage treatment plant would better protect our priceless creek and coastal resources. We need our council to work diligently with the county and inland cities to accomplish critically needed and long overdue ?green?
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 12, 2008
Laguna Beach is dropping its study of the dumping of dredged materials from Newport Beach’s Back Bay at a site three miles off the coast of Laguna, after a subcommittee determined there was no cause for alarm. The Laguna Beach City Council on March 4 accepted the verdict of its Newport Harbor Dumping Site Sub-committee — Mayor Jane Egly and Councilman Kelly Boyd — that their research should be terminated. “After hearing reports, Kelly and I decided there was no reason to go forward,” Egly said.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 14, 2008
Laguna Beach is dropping its study of the dumping of dredged materials from Newport Beach?s Back Bay at a site three miles off the coast of Laguna, after a subcommittee determined there was no cause for alarm. The Laguna Beach City Council on March 4 accepted the verdict of its Newport Harbor Dumping Site subcommittee ? Mayor Jane Egly and Councilman Kelly Boyd ? that their research should be terminated. ?After hearing reports, Kelly and I decided there was no reason to go forward,?
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | April 30, 2010
Laguna Beach residents will pay more to dump waste into city sewers for at least the next four years. The City Council voted at the April 20 meeting to continue annual 3.5% increases, which began seven years ago, through fiscal year 2014-15. There was no public opposition at the meeting to the increases, which will top out with bills of $581 a year for the average single-family home added to property taxes. ?We are raising property taxes and nobody is here,? said Mayor Pro Tem Toni Iseman, declaring herself amazed.
BUSINESS
By Candice Baker | October 26, 2007
For Lagunans, Halloween doesn’t have to mean an out-of-town trip to Wal-Mart or the vast costume warehouse on El Toro Road. There are plenty of options for candy and one-of-a-kind costumes right here in town. At the top of many kids’ lists is the Candy Baron, 231 Forest Ave. The shop just received a boatload of Halloween-oriented goodies earlier this week and still has an assortment of Harry Potter Chocolate Frogs and Acid Pops. A bucket of wax lips sits near a display of Toxic Waste Nuclear Sludge candy, perfect for any youngster dressing up as the San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant.
NEWS
By Elisabeth M. Brown | February 14, 2013
Seen from the air, the Mississippi snakes across the terrain in thousands of curves and loops. The landscape is dominated by circular and semicircular arcs, the remains of old meanders. Cutoff loops become ponds or lakes, called bayous. A river's length and shape are determined by a number of factors: topography and volume of water are the most important. In its mountainous headwaters, a river is fast-moving; rushing straight down slope, rough with rapids, and carrying large boulders.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007
Musical instruments focus of gallery show A show of sculptural pieces crafted from musical instruments will run Saturday to Wednesday at Pure Color Gallery, 570 S. Coast Hwy. The works are by Rebecca Apodaca, a Laguna Beach local of Navajo/Mexican descent. The art is formed from horns, violins and fretted instruments. Apodaca is also a state-certified musical instrument-repair technician and is currently working on her certification through UC Irvine in appraisal studies of fine and decorative art, specializing in musical instruments.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 7, 2013
An aging and decrepit pipe that carries solid waste through parkland from the coastal treatment plant to the regional treatment plant will be replaced, despite environmental concerns. The City Council voted 4-1 on Tuesday for the project, which was recommended by the South Orange County Wastewater Authority as the most feasible in terms of funding, longevity and urgency to avoid a catastrophic spill from the deteriorating pipe along Aliso Creek. "Replacing the pipe is the right project," said Betty Burnett, assistant general manager and district counsel for the South Coast Water District, which is one of the four agencies including the city of Laguna that are participating in the project.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 14, 2013
The City Council delayed a vote Tuesday on plans to separate the solids from waste water at the coastal treatment plant. Council members were split 2-2 on the recommendation by city staff to replace the existing line that pumps the solids — called sludge — to a regional treatment plant. Mayor Kelly Boyd and Councilwoman Toni Iseman, the city's representative on the South Orange County Wastewater Authority, which oversees the coastal plant, favored the recommendation. Councilmen Bob Whalen and Steven Dicterow sided with environmentalists who opposed it. But all agreed to hold off a vote until Mayor Pro Tem Elizabeth Pearson, who was ailing, was back on the dais.
NEWS
By Sharon Larimer | March 27, 2009
The Laguna Beach City Council vote and commitment to find a greener, ecological alternative to the SUPER project for Aliso Creek is the right action. A multifaceted approach to directly reduce storm water flows into Aliso Creek by installing cisterns and modernizing the sewage treatment plant would better protect our priceless creek and coastal resources. We need our council to work diligently with the county and inland cities to accomplish critically needed and long overdue ?green?
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 14, 2008
Laguna Beach is dropping its study of the dumping of dredged materials from Newport Beach?s Back Bay at a site three miles off the coast of Laguna, after a subcommittee determined there was no cause for alarm. The Laguna Beach City Council on March 4 accepted the verdict of its Newport Harbor Dumping Site subcommittee ? Mayor Jane Egly and Councilman Kelly Boyd ? that their research should be terminated. ?After hearing reports, Kelly and I decided there was no reason to go forward,?
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | March 12, 2008
Laguna Beach is dropping its study of the dumping of dredged materials from Newport Beach’s Back Bay at a site three miles off the coast of Laguna, after a subcommittee determined there was no cause for alarm. The Laguna Beach City Council on March 4 accepted the verdict of its Newport Harbor Dumping Site Sub-committee — Mayor Jane Egly and Councilman Kelly Boyd — that their research should be terminated. “After hearing reports, Kelly and I decided there was no reason to go forward,” Egly said.
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