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NEWS
April 29, 2005
Lauren Vane Bill Roley wants Laguna Canyon to get back to nature. The Laguna Beach resident has come up with an idea that he says will both address environmental concerns on the flood-prone canyon road and bring the community together.Roley is presenting a watershed management project to the City Council, in hopes that community members will decide to get to work and reduce ocean pollution and flooding in the canyon corridor. "Instead of digging up the past, I'm helping to invent the future," said Roley, who previously worked as a watershed coordinator at California Dept.
NEWS
June 17, 2005
Suzie Harrison Pacific Marine Mammal Center invites children ages 8 to 12 to experience a one-of-a-kind camp experience, Camp Pinniped. Now in its fifth season, the five-day summer camp gives youngsters an up-close opportunity to learn about California sea lions, harbor seals and Northern elephant seals, up-close and personal. Each day has a different theme with related games, arts and crafts and activities. Education director Meg Jones said many campers return each year.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | April 27, 2007
Someone other than Councilwoman Elizabeth Schneider, who sits on state Regional Water Quality Control Board-San Diego Region, will have to represent the City Council's opposition to some provisions in the proposed new regional permit. Schneider, appointed to the board by Gov. Schwarzenegger, is banned from voting at the board hearings on the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit because she is an elected official for an area that is impacted. "I can't vote there, so I feel I can vote here [at council]
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 5, 2009
Mayor Pro Tem Elizabeth Pearson went to bat at the Jan. 27 City Council meeting for the Aliso Creek SUPER Project. Pearson rebutted the opposition announced by newly elected Councilwoman Verna Rollinger to the SUPER Project, which stands for Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration. The majority of the funding for the project would come from the federal government, with a lesser portion from local agencies, which Pearson has diligently pursued. “I feel I should be on the record in opposition to this project,” Rollinger said.
LOCAL
By Roger E. Butow | June 30, 2008
Failed Environmental Planning: South County Watersheds “Success has a thousand fathers; failure is an orphan.” Origin Unknown Never was a quote so true as this one in regards to the degrading watersheds and alarming water quality impairments in South Orange County. County or municipal taxpayers aren’t being asked to shoulder the major burden of ecological restoration, even though it was our Board of Supervisors and other locally elected officials who got us into this mess.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | October 13, 2006
With her pet dog Pedro in tow, Laguna artist and Arts Commissioner Joan Corman laid the ceremonial first storm drain marker Wednesday at the corner of Forest Ave. and Glenneyre Street. "When I read the call for entries in our local newspapers, I felt it was the perfect competition for me," Corman said. "Growing up in Laguna Beach, the daughter of an artist, I naturally respected our ocean, loved our tide pools and currently teach watercolor tide pool journaling classes." Corman, who won the marker design competition in May, teaches the classes to visitors at area hotels in addition to working and teaching at her studio.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
Betty Swenson, mother of longtime Laguna Beach City Clerk Verna Rollinger, died May 30 at the age of 89. Born in 1918 in Greeley, Colorado, she grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from Fremont High School. She worked for some 24 years for the Los Angeles County Assessor, beginning her career as a personal property appraiser and retiring in 1978 as chief of the systems division. On her retirement, she moved to Laguna Beach, where, having acquired an A.A. degree in real estate, she worked briefly as a Realtor.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond, coastlinepilot@latimes.com | April 21, 2011
Members of the Laguna Canyon Flood Mitigation Task Force will take a look next week at how rain drains from the canyon watersheds. The April 30 tour is open to the public, but residents are asked to reserve a spot to determine how many vehicles will be needed to caravan to key locations. The time and location of pick ups will be published on the task force link of the city's website . Planning Commissioner Norm Grossman is one of the 11 members of the task force charged with determining ways that canyon residents and public agencies can prevent the loss of life and property from flooding.
NEWS
By Cindy Frazier | April 16, 2009
A 7-mile stretch of Aliso Creek is under study by the Army Corps of Engineers and the County of Orange for ways to improve wildlife habitat and water quality. The study is separate from the SUPER (Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration) Project, a $45 million federal effort to tame the Aliso watercourse, which is subject to flooding and erosion. The study is a spinoff of an overall Orange County Watershed study of 2002 — which preceded the SUPER Project — and will evaluate the creek from Pacific Park in Aliso Viejo to the ocean, including 1,000 feet of the Wood Canyon tributary to Aliso Creek, said John Vivante, lead planner with the Corps for the watershed project.
NEWS
By Tracey Laity | June 9, 2006
LA CA√ĎADA FLINTRIDGE — Efforts to get an environmental study of the Arroyo Seco off the ground received a $200,000 boost from the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water on Friday, but the study still needs more than $1 million in federal funding if it is to be completed within three years, officials said. Rep. Adam Schiff — who represents Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena — originally submitted a request for $600,000 in funding from the sub-committee but is still optimistic about the long-term prospects of the proposed study.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond, coastlinepilot@latimes.com | April 21, 2011
Members of the Laguna Canyon Flood Mitigation Task Force will take a look next week at how rain drains from the canyon watersheds. The April 30 tour is open to the public, but residents are asked to reserve a spot to determine how many vehicles will be needed to caravan to key locations. The time and location of pick ups will be published on the task force link of the city's website . Planning Commissioner Norm Grossman is one of the 11 members of the task force charged with determining ways that canyon residents and public agencies can prevent the loss of life and property from flooding.
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NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | February 5, 2009
Mayor Pro Tem Elizabeth Pearson went to bat at the Jan. 27 City Council meeting for the Aliso Creek SUPER Project. Pearson rebutted the opposition announced by newly elected Councilwoman Verna Rollinger to the SUPER Project, which stands for Stabilization, Utility Protection and Environmental Restoration. The majority of the funding for the project would come from the federal government, with a lesser portion from local agencies, which Pearson has diligently pursued. “I feel I should be on the record in opposition to this project,” Rollinger said.
LOCAL
By Roger E. Butow | June 30, 2008
Failed Environmental Planning: South County Watersheds “Success has a thousand fathers; failure is an orphan.” Origin Unknown Never was a quote so true as this one in regards to the degrading watersheds and alarming water quality impairments in South Orange County. County or municipal taxpayers aren’t being asked to shoulder the major burden of ecological restoration, even though it was our Board of Supervisors and other locally elected officials who got us into this mess.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
Betty Swenson, mother of longtime Laguna Beach City Clerk Verna Rollinger, died May 30 at the age of 89. Born in 1918 in Greeley, Colorado, she grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from Fremont High School. She worked for some 24 years for the Los Angeles County Assessor, beginning her career as a personal property appraiser and retiring in 1978 as chief of the systems division. On her retirement, she moved to Laguna Beach, where, having acquired an A.A. degree in real estate, she worked briefly as a Realtor.
NEWS
By Barbara Diamond | April 27, 2007
Someone other than Councilwoman Elizabeth Schneider, who sits on state Regional Water Quality Control Board-San Diego Region, will have to represent the City Council's opposition to some provisions in the proposed new regional permit. Schneider, appointed to the board by Gov. Schwarzenegger, is banned from voting at the board hearings on the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit because she is an elected official for an area that is impacted. "I can't vote there, so I feel I can vote here [at council]
NEWS
By Candice Baker | October 13, 2006
With her pet dog Pedro in tow, Laguna artist and Arts Commissioner Joan Corman laid the ceremonial first storm drain marker Wednesday at the corner of Forest Ave. and Glenneyre Street. "When I read the call for entries in our local newspapers, I felt it was the perfect competition for me," Corman said. "Growing up in Laguna Beach, the daughter of an artist, I naturally respected our ocean, loved our tide pools and currently teach watercolor tide pool journaling classes." Corman, who won the marker design competition in May, teaches the classes to visitors at area hotels in addition to working and teaching at her studio.
NEWS
June 17, 2005
Suzie Harrison Pacific Marine Mammal Center invites children ages 8 to 12 to experience a one-of-a-kind camp experience, Camp Pinniped. Now in its fifth season, the five-day summer camp gives youngsters an up-close opportunity to learn about California sea lions, harbor seals and Northern elephant seals, up-close and personal. Each day has a different theme with related games, arts and crafts and activities. Education director Meg Jones said many campers return each year.
NEWS
April 29, 2005
Lauren Vane Bill Roley wants Laguna Canyon to get back to nature. The Laguna Beach resident has come up with an idea that he says will both address environmental concerns on the flood-prone canyon road and bring the community together.Roley is presenting a watershed management project to the City Council, in hopes that community members will decide to get to work and reduce ocean pollution and flooding in the canyon corridor. "Instead of digging up the past, I'm helping to invent the future," said Roley, who previously worked as a watershed coordinator at California Dept.
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